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SOCIETY OF LAND SPEED RACING HISTORIANS
NEWSLETTER 274 - March 5, 2012
Editor: Richard Parks, Rnparks1@Juno.com 
President of the Society: Jim Miller, 1-818-846-5139.
Photographic Editor of the Society
: Roger Rohrdanz, beachtruck@juno.com
Northern California Reporter: Spencer Simon, sparklecraftspecial@yahoo.com
Field Reporter/Historian: Bob Falcon, RFalcon500@aol.com

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Some Names To Look For In This Newsletter:
Guest Editorial by the SAN Network of SEMA; Staff addendum to Guest Editorial; Staff Editorial by Richard Parks; Staff notes: Ron Main sent in the following notice; After researching and creating a memorial site to almost 400 drag racers who lost their lives while racing on drag strips, it seemed only natural and fitting that I also create a memorial site for land and speed racers; George Poteet and Speed Demon to be inducted to the Dry Lakes Hall of Fame at the 20th annual “Gas Up” and Dry Lakes Racing Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony; Do you have a book or article about Dawson Hadley; Looking for anything on Jimmy Summers; he was my grandfather, I know he ran a stock V-8 on 5-15-38 at Muroc, car number 266; Mark Rebilas' photos in my dragster at the 2013 Winternationals in Pomona; Attached is a photo of a 1950 class winner trophy from the Santa Ana Drag strip that I recently acquired from an antique mall in southern California; Staff notes: The following You Tube video was sent in by Ron Main; Do your old records have any information on the following car; From Kathy Weida at All American Racers, Inc, who sends in this message from Kati Blackledge, the granddaughter of the late Phil Remington; I remember my first local drag race at National Trail Raceway when I was only 11 (1968) like it was yesterday; Staff notes: The following came from Jessica Clark and the SLSRH Newsletter could not process this information fast enough to let you all know about her interview, but perhaps you can find something about it on the internet; Staff notes: The following men have been honored for their racing exploits and should be prime examples to our members to reach out and try and complete biographies for them if they haven’t already been done; Great NHRA video from the late 1950's called "Ingenuity In Action"; Staff notes: The following information comes from Ginny Dixon of the Fabulous 50’s; Staff notes: It must be true; Irwindale Speedway is back in business; One of my articles that I wrote was on my friend, Olympic Bike rider Linda Jackson; Tom Fritz Art Gallery now through March 1st, 2013 all my art orders over $250 will ship with a signed and dated sheet of USPS FOREVER Muscle Cars Stamps; Attached is pdf file containing a press release regarding a new sponsor of the project to restore Europe’s first dragster – Sydney Allard’s 1961 Allard Chrysler owned by the National Motor Museum, Beaulieu;  Pictures of the '32 Ford Roadster I owned back in the late '40's and early '50

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Guest Editorial by the SAN Network of SEMA
   A SEMA notice to hot rodders concerning the Montana Anti-Hobbyist Inoperable Vehicle Bill.  Legislation (Montana House Bill 409) to provide a limit on the number of inoperable motor vehicles allowed to accumulate on private property under "community decay" laws will be considered by the House Local Government Committee on Thursday, February 14, 2013. Under the bill, four or more "junk vehicles" on private property would constitute community decay.  We urge you to contact members of the House Local Government Committee (list attached below) immediately to request their opposition to House Bill 409. In Montana, a "junk vehicle" means a motor vehicle, including component parts that is discarded, ruined, wrecked, or dismantled; is not lawfully and validly licensed; and that remains inoperative or incapable of being driven. Even vehicles that are permanently registered, but meet these criteria are considered junk vehicles. Under the "community decay" laws, after giving notice in writing of a violation and upon the failure of the property owner to comply with removal, county officers may enter private property to remove the "junk vehicles" and may assess the property owner for the actual costs for the removal. Nonpayment of the assessment becomes a lien upon the property and is enforceable in the same manner as the nonpayment of property taxes.  
   House Bill 409 limits to three the number of inoperable vehicles permitted on private property.  House Bill 409 provides no reasonable concessions for legitimate automotive hobbyists that choose to work on more than three inoperable collector vehicles on private property. House Bill 409 could outlaw the repair or modification of certain motor vehicles that are undergoing restoration.  House Bill 409 would limit the maintenance of parts cars available to hobbyists for motor vehicles undergoing restoration. House Bill 409 establishes no provisions that would enable vehicles located out of public view to avoid being classified as junk. Please contact members of the Montana House Local Government Committee immediately to request their opposition to House Bill 409. Please e-mail a copy of your letter to Steve McDonald at stevem@sema.org. Also, please forward this Alert to your fellow car enthusiasts. Urge them to join the SAN and help defend the hobby! Thank you for your assistance.

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Staff addendum to Guest Editorial;
   The SEMA organization works on behalf of the hot rodding and automotive enthusiast’s communities. SEMA wants to see that the automotive public is protected from onerous laws and attacks. You don’t have to be a member of SEMA to receive help from this fine organization. Google SEMA and simply find their SAN network and add it to your list of favorites and check out their website. You can also email SEMA and ask to be put on their mailing list and they will send you a monthly or periodic update of their work. They will also send you a list of car shows in your area and around the country. If you can, join SEMA and help support them in their efforts to bring fairness to hot rodders across the nation.
   As you can see, the state of Montana is trying to make the determination as to what is junk and what isn’t. Does anyone have the right to tell you that you can only have four cars on your property? Does anyone have the right to tell you what is junk? The Constitution allows laws to regulate us and so do the states, but when laws go beyond the public good into “despotism of tyranny” then the state has gone too far. If you do not stand up with other likeminded hot rodders then you can’t complain at a later date that your freedoms have been taken from you. You, and many like you, are at fault for the loss of your rights and freedoms.

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Staff Editorial by Richard Parks:   
   An interesting and informative website is called Land Speed Racers Memorial, located at http://lsrdeaths.webs.com/.  The site is owned and maintained by Mel Bashore. He gives the names and details of the accident that took the life of a land speed racer. Here is the index by name and year of accident.
   Arnett (1995), Beckett (2005), Bennett (1964), Bible (1929), Bigelow (1951), Black (1970), Blair (1940s), Bryant (2009), Buckmaster (1972), Cass (1948, Dean (1984), Donaldson (1955), Emick (1969), Fadave (1949), Fancher (1949), Fernihough (1938), Funk (1962), Glover (1948), Graham (1960), Gullett (2008), Haller (1953), Herda (1969), Jacobs (2006), Johnson (1950), Johnston (1998), Lambert (1913), Leasher (1962), Lockhart (1928), Lubinsky (1969) , McGregor (1949), Parry-Thomas (1927)     Pendleton (1949), Resta (1924), Robinson (1950), Rosemeyer (1938), Schlegel (1947), Werder (1949), White (2002), Windman (1934), Wynja (1951).
   Resources to do research are often scanty and sparse. Compiling a list of racers, mechanics, car owners, sponsors, etc is often based on what’s available and death notices and obituaries are very helpful to the racing historian. Yes, it’s macabre and sad, but at least we have records to work with in compiling a history. Other sources include programs and the notations made in the program by an interested spectator or crewmember. We cannot be certain that such programs or notations, or for that matter even an obituary or biography is 100% accurate, but we have to go with the written word, unless we have other evidence. I publish what our researchers discover and what is sent to me. Each issue then goes to a panel of 15 people who check it over to the best of their knowledge. If mistakes creep into the record it concerns us and as soon as we find out that the facts are wrong we make changes and go back and try and find the original issue and change it to reflect the new knowledge that we have.
   I can’t hold up material; it needs to be published. Holding up material results in one thing; it gets lost in the shuffle and never sees the light of day. I’ve got about 100 projects that I know are in the works, have been in the works for years and will probably stay lost in the works long after I am dead. In this I am not unusual, and that explains nearly every hot rodder who ever lived. On our tombstones it should read; “Here lies H. H. Herkimer, a hot rodder who still had projects to finish.” Maybe that’s the way it should be, for when we run out of projects, life really isn’t fun anymore. Yes, it’s sad to have to work the obituary columns in the newspapers and Roger hates it when he sees me writing biographies and interviewing people at funerals. I don’t feel that way because the deceased promised me his/her biography when alive and now the only way to get his bio is to attend his/her funeral. We can learn a lot from obituaries, but I would much rather interview all of you while you are alive. 
   Harry Pallenberg has a website at www.wheretheyraced.com that has a great deal of important historical racing material from the past in Southern California. Harry was an associate and assistant producer on the late Huell Howser PBS series ‘California’s Gold.’ Harry’s idea was to borrow from Ralph Storey’s show, ‘Things that aren’t here any more,’ also on PBS. In this case, the things that aren’t here any more are race tracks and drag strips and Harry’s goal is to capture the history of our rich racing tradition. Harold Osmer, who has published several books on racing history in Southern California, is collaborating with Harry. Using material from Osmer’s books entitled ‘Where they Raced,’ Pallenberg and Osmer have created a show worthy of PBS and television in general. But financial backing is hard to come by and for the present they are showing their videos on Vimeo and it is all free. Just log onto their website and watch the videos. 
   Osmer’s books are also available and you can find them at the Wally Parks NHRA Motorsports Museum bookstore and gift shop by calling 909-622-2133. We are hoping that financial support will arise that allows Pallenberg and Osmer to put this show on PBS. What would be even better is if a sponsor could be found who would support Pallenberg and Osmer and other historians and film producers in bringing us shows on race tracks and drag strips all over America that “
Aren’t Here Any More.”  Here’s more from Pallenberg; “Episode 2 is now up. See http://www.wheretheyraced.com, to see it or go to Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/WhereTheyRaced. Episode 3 begins at the start/finish line of the Santa Monica Road Races which ran from 1909 - 1919. Then we take a detour with special guests Don Pullen (Eddie's son), Brian Blain, Pete Eastwood and Huell Howser at the Corona Races of 1913, ‘14, and ‘16. Finally we finish the episode back in Santa Monica on the long Wilshire Blvd straightaway - but we don’t get back to the start/finish; that will be in part 2 (episode 3) next week. Visit www.wheretheyraced.com for more information and past episodes. Buckle up! Harry Pallenberg. Web: www.wheretheyraced.com, Facebook: www.facebook.com/WhereTheyRaced.”
   On another issue, this came in from a member. “
I wasn't comfortable with the political rhetoric (in the guest editorial).”  This is a perfectly good opinion by the member and the staff of the SLSRH takes into account the potential backlash and non-acceptance of anything political in the newsletter. However, it is an impossibility to avoid political comment. For example, when Save the Salt asks for help and donations to force the chemical companies to put back the unused salt on the Bonneville Salt Flats that is a political action. They are asking for political muscle and money to fight for what they believe in. “Dyno” Don Batyi believes in political action by hot rodders to avert laws and regulations that would destroy the hot rodding and racing communities. His view is that unless we work together, we won’t have a sport, and racing and hot rodding will be outlawed. Only the foolish, na´ve, immature and complete babbling idiots believe in a world where everyone treats everyone else with utter respect. The world that we live in would ban cars and carbon usage in a heartbeat if they could. 
   State legislators are actively passing laws right now to limit our way of life. I’ve seen a lot of laws passed in my lifetime and many more that barely failed to pass. Those who hate what we love would like to see any old car junked, crushed and made into new, small and energy efficient vehicles that can’t be raced or shown on the streets. Many state officials want to make us live in their cookie cutter world of one model. These officials hate variety and inventiveness. They see no need for anything large or for hobbies that allow us to be individuals. Legislators limit our access to wilderness areas and public land. They tell us what to buy, and how many cars we can have on our property, even if we attempt to fence our homes and keep the cars from public view. These legislators tell us we must pay them a “carbon tax” and other exorbitant fees if we want to keep our vehicles. The question we should ask is by what right do state officials have to take money from us for what often turns out to be private slush funds for legislators own usage? So in answer to the question about being comfortable or uncomfortable with political commentary, the answer is that we cannot separate ourselves from political comments, for if we do we shall surely lose what few rights we have. 

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Staff notes: Ron Main sent in the following notice.
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The 100th ANNIVERSARY OF BONNEVILLE; “A CENTURY OF SPEED” 1914- 2014.  The past, present and future of Bonneville will all come to life as we celebrate the 100th Anniversary of racing on the Bonneville Salt Flats at the Grand National Roadster Show at the Fairplex in Pomona California. And help preserve its future.  See the most elite gathering of the World’s Fastest Vehicles ever driven at the Bonneville Salt Flats in the special Century of Speed building at the 65th Grand National Roadster Show, January 24-26 2014.  The Bonneville Century of Speed exhibit will celebrate and raise awareness of our current Save the Salt campaign.  We wish to invite you to showcase it and all of the 65th Grand National Roadster Show.  You will not only see almost 100 of the greatest land speed record cars and motorcycles of the past hundred years, but in addition you will see over 500 show vehicles competing for awards inside all the other buildings.  Another 400-500 show vehicles will join the show and will park between the buildings also as part of the show.  A special book signing will take place every day, so please join us for the Fun, Flash and the Future of the Bonneville Salt Flats. See our web sites for information; www.bonnevillecenturyofspeed.com,  www.rodshows.com, www.speeddemon.com.
     The book
BONNEVILLE A CENTURY OF SPEED will be premiering at the Grand National Roadster Show in the CENTURY OF SPEED building.  A special book signing will take place every day for the Save the Salt Foundation. The Century of Speed Show will feature almost 100 of the greatest land speed record cars and motorcycles of the past hundred years.  This Limited 1st edition of just 2000 books will be produced in hard cover.  Approximately 150 pages in full color with a dust jacket will be printed.  The books will be numbered 1 through 2000 and have a retail price of $24.95.  All 2000 books will be printed and donated free of charge to the Save the Salt Foundation.  The purpose is to promote and raise money for Save the Salt Foundation.  There will be a special book price of a $20 donation to the Save the Salt Foundation and it will be offered to those who attend the Grand National Roadster Show at Pomona, or it can be ordered online.  Book purchase funds go entirely towards supporting the Save the Salt Foundation.  We need your help, please give me a call at 818-998-7848 or 818-523-7005.  Bonneville Century of Speed, 1197 Los Angeles Avenue, Suite C, Simi Valley, Ca 93065.  Email rmain@canogarebar.com.  Special thanks to John Buck at the Grand National Roadster Show.   Ron Main

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After researching and creating a memorial site to almost 400 drag racers who lost their lives while racing on drag strips, it seemed only natural and fitting that I also create a memorial site for land and speed racers.  Living in Utah, I have attended Speed Week at Bonneville for more than a dozen years; an annual tradition for me and my sons.  I first went there in the early 1970's.  There had been attempts by others to put together lists of land speed racers who died while racing, but I wanted to enlarge those efforts with more information, and when possible, photos of the racer or car.  
     I got the bulk of my information from newspapers, augmented by help from interested people and the Internet.  I believe it is the most comprehensive listing of land speed racing fatalities either in print or on the Web, but it is dynamic and changes or additions are made when learned.  It is arranged chronologically and divided into pages by decades, beginning with the first documented LSR death at Brooklands in England in 1913 (Percy Lambert) to the present.  Each individual entry contains information about birth, death, burial place, age, full name, location of fatal accident, vehicle, brief biography, source citations, and photos or links to video clips.  
     There is an index page listing deaths by location internationally (El Mirage has had the most fatal accidents). There is a Forum page where others can share information or their memories of a driver.  I have a Links page where users can connect to other land speed racing history websites or to my other racing memorial sites including Drag Strip Deaths and Drag Boat and Water Speed Record Racer Memorial.  The link to the LSR Memorial is http://lsrdeaths.webs.com/.
     I'm not in one of the SCTA clubs.  I grew up in Southern California and fell in love with drag racing as a teenager in the 1950's; Pomona, Fontana, Lions, Riverside, Orange County, San Gabe, etc.  I came to Utah to attend college in the 1960's, worked for about a dozen years as a tech man at a drag strip in Salt Lake in the 1970's-'80's. Started going out to Bonneville yearly (sleeping on the salt) with my boys (all now grown).  It was a nice tradition that we still enjoy together.  They call it, "The Annual." I'm in the history business: historian/historic sites curator, but will be retiring in June after 38 years in the history business.  Mel Bashore
   Mel: Please sign in at www.landspeedracing.com and become a member of the Society of Land Speed Racing Historians.  It's free and you will enjoy getting a notice when the next issue is ready, usually every two weeks.  All members are contributors and can send in their history or the history they are researching on land speed racing, hot rodding and early drag racing to be included in the newsletter.  You can write in as often as you like and let people know about your website and hopefully add more readers to your site. 

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George Poteet and Speed Demon to be inducted to the Dry Lakes Hall of Fame at the 20th annual “Gas Up” and Dry Lakes Racing Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony. Please try to join the crew and Ron Main to honor George and the SPEED DEMON at the Hall of Fame on April 20, 2013 at the 20th Annual Dry Lakes Racing Hall of Fame. For more information see; http://www.hotrodhotline.com/george-poteet-and-speed-demon-be-inducted-dry-lakes-hall-fame.

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Do you have a book or article about Dawson Hadley? I may be working on his salt flat racer. Doug Pierce (Pierce Boys Racing, knotred601@comcast.net)
   Doug: Here are two sources in our files. Write back and tell us what you are doing and I will publish your remarks and maybe that will trigger more memories from our members. 
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   In 1952 the entry for the yellow car number 98 Class C coupe was Hartelt-Hadley. The car was Doug Hartelt's and was chopped at the Post Body Shop.  Jim Miller
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Gone Racin'...Dawson Hadley: Soft Spoken Genius.  Story and photographs by Bob Falcon, edited by Richard Parks, photographic consultant Roger Rohrdanz.      
     Most likely you have probably never heard his name before, but those of you who drive a modern motor car powered by a direct fuel injection, computer controlled engine have him to thank for his development efforts on such a system with these benefits in the early 1970’s. That is when Dawson and your writer first met and the introduction did not progress all that smoothly at launch.  I had taken a position with The Echlin Manufacturing Company whose central location was in Branford, Connecticut. My job was with their newly formed Auto Emissions Division located in West Los Angeles. This division was created to compete in a new auto emissions program begun by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) to combat a new element that was polluting the Southland air. This unnamed pollutant was identified as NOX. Technically this element is composed of oxides of nitrogen that form in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine.   It is the result of ultra high combustion temperatures coupled with the CARB mandated lean fuel mixtures in the 1970’s engines as dictated by the CARB war on smog and the automobile.  Echlin had developed a device that was quoted to be a high frequency sound wave generator that directed a high frequency vibration at the fuel mixture as it passed from the carburetor to the intake manifold. The division was composed of a group of Field Service Engineers who assisted the auto dealer service departments, auto parts jobbers and auto service training schools in dealing with The Echlin Device and CARB dictates.
     My job was in the field services group and as part of an army of six representatives that covered a huge portion of Southern California to the Mexican border.  Echlin, an old line auto ignition parts manufacturer, also had a high performance division for their auto ignition equipment line that was marketed under the “Accel” banner. Accel had purchased a small, local company that was owned by a pair of dry lakes racers; the Spaulding brothers. The Spaulding’s, who produced a line of aftermarket high performance ignition systems, had just introduced a system that employed an optical system in place of contact points as the trigger. Their system, named “Breakerless Distributor Ignition” (BDI) was a new form of the high energy “Capacitive Discharge” (CD) ignition systems that were all the rage in high performance automotive circles. When Accel purchased Spaulding Ignitions they also obtained the services of the designer of the BDI system, Dawson Hadley.  The emissions division had moved from West Los Angeles to Huntington Beach, which is in Orange County. The new Accel Ignition facility was located in Monrovia, California in the San Gabriel Valley. The CARB NOX program had become a “political football” and was bouncing around several state courts due to the moans and groans from several of the manufacturing participants.
     While the program was in a paused stage I needed something to do in my downtime. I had been promoted to chief field service engineer, so I asked our division manager, “Skip” Gackstetter, if it would be OK for me to visit the Monrovia facility and see if I could provide them some help on their service desk, if they had one, and he agreed that it might be a good idea. He also told me that Dawson was managing the facility composed of nearly 20 people and had several new products under development on his drafting table and he would probably welcome some assistance from a qualified person.  I visited the shop and introduced myself to Dawson and we soon discovered that we had a lot of mutual friends in the auto racing business which went a long way in reducing the stigma that I was a “Hatchet Man” assigned by top management. He was struggling to maintain full production while he was completing some designs on new applications of the Accel re-branded “Breakerless Electronic Ignition” (BEI) systems.
     Wearing that many “hats” working as general manager, purchasing agent, manufacturing  and testing engineer, and chief designer, he was like the theatrical juggler who had several “balls in the air” at any given moment. I asked if there was anything I could do to ease his burden. He seemed suspicious of my reason for being there; that perhaps I was dispatched by Echlin management to take over his operation. I suggested we take a lunch break to discuss why I was there which, in reality, was that I needed some real work to fill my days since my division was marking time. Once he realized my honesty, we decided that I would work at the Monrovia plant three days a week and spend the other two days at The Echlin Huntington Beach facility. This was a smart move on my part since Monrovia is just a short city street drive from my home in Rosemead. I called “Skip” at Emissions and mentioned that I had visited with Dawson and he was happy to have me to help operate his facility and that we had discussed it over lunch and I informed him of the schedule we determined. His response was a simple statement, “You spend all the time you need there and if I need you for anything I’ll give you a call.”  Long story short; Dawson and I made a good management team. 
     That’s when he told me about a free lance project he had designed in conjunction with Fairchild Electronics in Palo Alto, California. The system was a computer controlled fuel injection system that measured the fuel requirement for each cylinder based on air flow and temperature and the computer adjusted the fuel quantity and spark timing for that particular cylinder. He had completed a prototype test unit that was tuned for a demonstrator auto fleet that could be moved from one car brand to another quickly. These modified cars were dispatched to the car factories for testing and evaluation. Each test car model was specific to a particular manufacturer. The prototype was now installed on a late 1960’s Lincoln (I’m not sure of the Mark series number).  The electronics package was in the form of a “bread board” that was placed on the front seat close to the driver. The Lincoln was due to be driven to Michigan for a presentation to FoMoCo (Ford).  Fairchild needed an auto manufacturer to sponsor miniaturization of the circuit boards into film chips, which was a very expensive proposition at the time, well into the mid-six figure range. The current US manufacturing formula of “cost multiplied by five times” added to the Retail selling price was considered prohibitive.  The Lincoln was ferried to the proving ground for the demonstration and the driver was directed to return with the car to Silicon Valley in northern California.
     One day during one of our frequent lunch meetings, Dawson remarked, “You know that driver and the Lincoln disappeared!” Turns out that no one had heard a word from him in more than three weeks and his pay checks were waiting for him at the Fairchild headquarters in Palo Alto. About two weeks later Dawson declared, “They found that driver. He is in Louisiana and he ran out of money. He’s been Street Racing all over the country and has been quite successful but his streak ended.” On one occasion when that Lincoln was down here in Los Angeles I had the chance to drive it. The circuit board housings were in the front seat and they were fitted with adjustable “pots” on the boxes and you could dial them to an “economy” setting and register fuel mileage in excess of 30 MPG from that 460 CID engine. A setting of “performance” would smoke the rear tires off their rims.  Dawson was a graduate mechanical engineer and was self taught in electronic and chemical engineering. He was the target of a lot of bad criticism by members of the emissions staff in part due to his manner of voice which was of a very low volume and identified his detractors to the negative side since they believed him to be of low intelligence. Many experts in the auto field thought the BEI at that time was a fraud. But not long afterward Chrysler, and then followed by GM, introduced their versions of electronic ignition systems. 
     In racing circles the BEI was on the receiving end of adverse publicity because of failures in the Indy 500. The problem there was that the Spaulding BDI located the electronic circuit board assemblies inside the Amplifier housing that was a 3 x 4 x 3-inch aluminum casting. Vibration from the four cylinder Offy engine and the stiff springing of the down force of the current Indy cars caused the solder joints for the electronic components to disintegrate and the electronics failed. Filling the assembled Amplifier housing with epoxy, a new process in aerospace electronics at the time, rigidly located the circuit boards, and the failures stopped. But the damage was done and use of the BEI on USAC Championship Circuit dwindled to six cars. I will have more about this subject in a future column. The BEI was doing great in the auto aftermarket and in NASCAR racing. We had field service engineers present at the drag racing events of three different associations around the US. We were also supplying a few Gold Cup boat teams with the BEI ignition systems for their Allison powered hydroplanes. They replaced the heavy wartime aviation magnetos with the lightweight units which amounted to an overall performance improvement.
     Dawson could see that much had to be done in high performance equipment to keep them out of the focus of the CARB, a group which was anti-automotive in nature. He sensed that product design and marketing needed to place more emphasis on cleaning up the air we breathe especially for our children, and he had a large group of those “Little Rascals” at his home! I sat amazed at a dinner table when Dawson and “Racer” Brown were having a conversation about emissions and racing engines. Two noted racing equipment geniuses discussing the steps that would improve the air quality and at the same time improve the power of racing engines. They left me in the dust!  Later my job was changed from chief emissions field service engineer to that of manager of the engineers servicing the various racing bodies that the Echlin/Accel Company supported with their contingency awards program. Each of my field service guys toured the country in a van that was equipped with a Sun Distributor Machine and a supply of spare ignition parts. This team also was scheduled to hold briefing sessions and provide distributor service at various auto parts jobber and speed shop facilities.
     Their weekends were spent at a drag strip or a race track somewhere. I continued to reside in Los Angeles and commuted to Branford, Connecticut every week. I would visit each of the events on Thursday to make certain my guy was on-site and set up properly. Often I would visit one site on Thursday and another on Friday but I covered the USAC Championship Indy Car circuit by myself. Of course I also stayed in close contact with Dawson since we had six teams that we needed to service and we had a lot of bad publicity that we had to prove wrong to the participating teams. We handled that in the best way possible by winning the 1973 USAC National Championship with the Lindsey Hopkins team that had Roger McCluskey as the driver and Don Koda as the Chief Mechanic. I had become good friends with this team so they transported my tools and spares to each venue on the schedule. Incidentally, this was the very first car to win the National Indy Car championship that was equipped with an electronic, battery powered ignition system.
     All Indy cars at present are outfitted with battery powered electronic ignition systems. Unfortunately, at present they are not Accel BEI systems!  Dawson ultimately left Echlin/Accel and began doing a lot of work for Edelbrock Equipment. He designed an aftermarket Water Injection system but for some reason it never got off the ground. Dawson had established a small laboratory in Montclair but not long after a massive heart attack took this soft spoken automotive genius away from us.  When Joanie called me to deliver the news she stated, “…he awoke in the middle of the night and the attack which took away his two largest virtues, his brain and his heart!”  I always held Dawson in very high regard as did many of his friends.  "Dawson Hadley owned and ran the former Pierson Brothers coupe at Bonneville in 1951 to a speed of 164.233 mph for first in class.  Dawson and Doug Hartelt ran the Class C Competition Coupe #98 at Bonneville in 1952 at 162.82 mph for a first in class," according to Jim Miller.
Gone Racin' is at RNPARKS1@JUNO.COM.  Bob Falcon is at
SCRIBBLERBOB@AOL.COM.
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Dawson Hadley mentioned in the Mike Kelley Story.

     My dad found a machine shop right around the corner from his house on Garey and took the head off his engine to have it surfaced. When he went in the shop he found a line of 4 bangers along one wall and everything you could imagine including Rileys, Millers, etc.  The man who owned the shop introduced himself by the name of Fred Hadley. 
     Fred Hadley’s machine shop was just around the corner from my dad’s house. When my dad took the head off of his four banger to be surfaced, Fred made a deal to trade my dad’s 4 banger for a 3/8 by 3/8 Mercury V8. Fred had every high performance 4 banger made. It was quite a collection. My dad sold the Model-T roadster that he had put together for the 4 banger and bought a 1934 five-window coupe to put the V8 in. He also met Dawson at his dad’s shop and they became good friends. Dawson would often work at his dad’s shop at night building motors for his race cars and hot rods. If my dad ever needed parts or machine work Dawson was always there to help. 
   My dad and Dawson put a blower on my dad’s five-window coupe. They could not get it to run as it should, so Dawson said he would ride with my dad to see if he could hear how the engine sounded under a load.   They were going down Garey Avenue talking to each other trying to diagnose the engine problem and they were not paying attention to the road. My dad T-boned a Model-A sedan and knocked it over on its side. The car was full of farm workers who could not speak English, but fortunately Joe Vallejo lived just around the corner from my dad, who ran over and got Joe. Vallejo talked to the Model-A driver and calmed him down. They put the Model-A back on its wheels and my dad paid for the damage to the sedan and then they were on their way.
Tom Spalding once told my dad that the only time he ever got scared in a car was when Fred Hadley gave him a ride through downtown Pomona in his 4 banger powered roadster. Tom said he could not believe that Fred’s roadster could go that fast. Spalding truly feared for his life and Fred was laughing the whole time.  
     My dad’s high school buddy was Dawson Hadley. Dawson was in junior high school when my dad was in high school, so there was a slight age difference between them. My dad said Dawson never went to school much, but he was still a genius. I have some very funny stories about Dawson; one story is that Dawson used one of his buddies as ballast in the trunk of his car at the Santa Ana drags. The car flipped over and the human ballast was found slightly injured and scared out of his wits, but trying to kill Dawson for this stunt.  Dawson was suspended from competition for that trick.  My dad had one sister and her name was Sharon Kelly Fulkerson.  She was a runner up for the Queen of the Rose Parade title and my dad said was the main reason Dawson was always hanging around the house.  Dawson and my aunt would ride horses that my grandfather had at the house in Pomona.  She always thought of Dawson as a nice kid as he was younger than my aunt.  My dad and Dawson and their other buddies would also use the 1/4 mile horse track to race their hot rods when my grandfather was at work. My dad’s 1934 5-window coupe was a pretty fast car. He raced Dawson at Santa Ana before Dawson blew up the motor (in the Pierson Brothers car). My dad said it wasn’t even close as Dawson was at least 5 car lengths ahead of him. My dad said the only other car that ever beat him that bad was Troy Ruttman’s 1940 Ford coupe. The only time Ruttman would lose was if he broke an axle.  All the street races were set up at the O&R Drive-in over in Pomona. It would have been an interesting race if Dawson and Ruttman had raced.
    Dawson took possession of the famous Pierson brothers’ coupe and liked it so much that he wanted to buy it. However, he blew up the motor in the coupe and asked my father what he should do since he still owed the brothers for the car. My dad told him that since Dawson blew up the engine that he now owned the car and had to pay for it and repairing the engine was his problem. Dawson, for whatever reason, towed the car back to the Pierson’s house and left it there. This confused the Pierson brothers as they thought the deal was final and they just wanted their money. The Pierson brothers talked to my dad and got him to go with them to see Dawson and find out what his intentions were. They knew that the car was at the home of Dawson's mother or grandmother (I think it was his mother) and that she was very well off.   She had a lot of Macy's Department Store stock plus other investments and she lived in Del Mar. My dad and the Pierson’s drove down to talk to Dawson and perhaps to do more than just talk. When they knocked on the door it was opened and they saw the mother coming down the stairs after getting out of the shower with no clothes on. This unnerved them and they thought about fleeing, but they also wanted the money owed them. Dawson offered to give them a Duesenberg which his family owned and got the pink slip from his family, though I am not sure if the engine was also a Duesenberg motor. Dawson also sweetened the deal by giving the Pierson's a lot of cash and speed equipment. Altogether it was a lot to give for the coupe at that time, but Dawson liked it so much that he was happy with the deal. At the time a Duesenberg was not that highly valued, but today it would be worth a small fortune. The coupe was used for joy riding around Pomona by Dawson, my dad and some of the other guys that hung out together. Usually Dawson would act as the driver while the others sat in the back drinking beer. Dawson really loved that coupe.

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Looking for anything on Jimmy Summers; he was my grandfather, I know he ran a stock V-8 on 5-15-38 Staff notes; A recent request came in concerning any history on Jimmy Summers, who raced a stock V-8 on 15 May 1938 at Muroc dry lake, car number 266. The requester also knows Stanton Barrett and his father set land speed records and was a stuntman. There are photographs of Jimmy Summers that says, back Cole8, Southern Ascot or Ascot Speedway. Stan Barrett was a stuntman and he did indeed go fast, but his record was never officially accepted. His son is Stanton Barrett and like his father he is a stuntman too. 
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   I looked in my 1937 Los Angeles phone book to see what I could find. There was no Summers Brothers Auto listed.  There were two Summers Auto Works listed, one in Glendale and the other in Pasadena but I think this was another Summers.  There are listings for- J.E., J.H., J.M. and J.A. Summers. Do you know his full name? It would be nice to know the names of his brothers too, so I could see if it is listed. After the war Jimmy Summers ran his business from his shop at 7919 Melrose Avenue, Hollywood, California. That is about three blocks east of Fairfax. I've heard stories that Jimmy was into the customs-hot rods and that his brother was into the race cars. The story continues that since the shop was only a few blocks from the Gilmore race track that the brother had a lot of work fixing bent racers. I've also heard stories that Jimmy later worked in a regular body shop later and made more money fixing crashed street driven cars than he did with his custom stuff. Jim Miller

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Mark Rebilas' photos in my dragster at the 2013 Winternationals in Pomona. See http://markjrebilas.com/blog/?p=17751&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+MarkJRebilasBlog+%28Mark+J+Rebilas+Blog%29. John Ewald

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Attached is a photo (Click for Image) of a 1950 class winner trophy from the Santa Ana Drag strip that I recently acquired from an antique mall in southern California. Thought it might be of interest to you guys. Feel free to share the photo as you see fit.   David Simmons
     David: Thank you for sending us the photograph of the 1950 Santa Ana Drag Strip class winning trophy.  I have a few questions; do you know who won the trophy and also who sold it to you?  If you live in the Southern California area there is a reunion for the Santa Ana Drags every April and October.  Let me know if you are interested and I will put you on the email list and notify you of the dates and times.
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   I do not know who won the trophy or who I bought it from as it was purchased from an antique mall booth in the San Fernando Valley.  It would be great to include me on your email list as I had an early association with drag racing as my uncle Harry Emmer from Burbank, California was heavily involved in racing in the fifties as an owner/driver at the dry lakes and later at mainly the San Fernando drag strip.  Many a Sunday I would spend with him there as he was a surrogate father to me.  He actually was the starter there after he stopped racing competitively before the days of the Christmas tree starting system.  Maybe some of the old timers remember him.  He was the head of transportation at Universal studios from the early sixties until he retired in the late seventies.  He donated all of his trophies/memorabilia etc, to the studio props department when he retired.  Brings back many memories.   David Simmons
   David: Membership in the Society of Land Speed Racing Historians Newsletter at www.landspeedracing.com is free.  All that you have to do is sign in at the website and then add the website to your list of favorites and check twice a month for a new issue of the newsletter.  Please share your memories with us, especially of Harry Emmer.  In April we should be holding another Santa Ana Drags Reunion and I will get the word out when I hear something.  Be sure to check with Jim Miller as he has a lot of early day records. 

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Staff notes: The following You Tube video was sent in by Ron Main.  "Team Vesco has announced that the Turbinator will be return to racing in August 2013 at Speed Week on the Bonneville Salt Flats.  TURBINATOR II will feature an all new carbon fiber body by AirTech.  This video tells the story of the making of the new body.  The sleek new aerodynamic body is 36 feet in length and 3 feet wide. Team Vesco currently hold the absolute International wheel driven speed record of 458.481 mph.  With the new design and new Marine Turbine Technology engine Team Vesco hopes to achieve an all out speed of 500 mph.  See http://youtu.be/ILPKu0pwcOM." 

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Do your old records have any information on the following car? A 1930's Model-A dry lakes racer sponsored by Mynatt's Esso Service center; Teardrop tantalizer. Our friend Geoff Hacker, while deeply immersed in the world of forgotten fiberglass cars from the 1950’s, also keeps an eye out for odd streamliners in his travels and recently found yet another one, though one without much solid history to go by.
   Geoff writes: “I bought the car from a collector, Bob O’Hara, in Frostproof, Florida. With a bit of luck and sleuthing, I was able to find the person he had bought it from; Ron Silliman. Back around the year 2000 (give or take a few years), Ron was on a trip to pick up an unrestored 1940 Ford Coupe up in Massachusetts. He bought the car from an elderly gentleman who used to run a junkyard at the same location. The junkyard was still there, but it had been closed for years.  So Ron got out and looked around a bit (like most of us car guys would do). When loading his 1940 Ford coupe from the junkyard lot, he noticed the body for an old teardrop car; he called it an ‘airplane’ car. And he had to have it; and the story that went with it too.”    
   By the way, the junkyard where the Ford and the teardrop car body were found was just northwest of Boston Massachusetts; in a rural area off of Route 128. Ron can’t recall the exact location or the town that it was near.  The elderly gentleman had originally stored the teardrop car near Newburg, New York; perhaps Middletown, New York. He either had found it in that area or had brought it back from Illinois where it had supposedly been built.  When he had it in New York, it was on a Ford chassis and it was powered by a Flathead Ford, and it was running. In fact, the elderly gentleman also used to drive the completed teardrop car around the Middletown area of New York.    
   I’m told that the gentleman remembered it was in the 1950’s when he bought the car in New York (or brought it to New York).  Years passed and he was brought down to Massachusetts.  Sometime later, the Model-A chassis and drive train was deemed too valuable to be under such a strange car body, so the body and chassis were separated, and the chassis went on to a different life.    
   The elderly gentleman told Ron that he was told that the teardrop/airplane car was originally built for a World’s Fair in Chicago or New York; or something similar. And, it may have been a ride that GM had put together for a “City of the Future.” He also was told that it may have run at the Salt Flats for speed in the 1930’s.    
   Thoughts: Now, in looking over the car body that remains, it was not finished at the level for use by a major manufacturer.  So, the story about it being created for a World’s Fair or other event is probably like many stories we’ve heard over the years; a fun story to tell about an unusual car. No doubt it was passed from person to person for years before. The story about its dry lakes heritage; who knows? But, based on what we’ve found on the car itself, some clues to its history come to the surface.    
   When Bob O’Hara started sanding down the doors he found remnants of its previous history. On the side of the doors he found what appears to be the words: “Mynatt’s Servicenter” and the “Esso” logo too. See attached photos for picture of Bob with the door. I’ve researched these names without any luck so far. Perhaps your readers can help.   Thanks, Bill Keogh, wllmkeogh@yahoo.com.  
   William: I will post your remarks in the newsletter and send this to Jim Miller.  Call him at 818-846-5139 and see if he has any records on this car. 

mysteryteardrop_02_1000

mysteryteardrop_03_1000

mysteryteardrop_04_1000

mysteryteardrop_05_1000

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From Kathy Weida at All American Racers, Inc, who sends in this message from Kati Blackledge, the granddaughter of the late Phil Remington.
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   Dear Friends, I want to thank you for the outpouring of love and support over the past few days since we lost “Grandpa Rem.” It has been a comfort to our family to read all of your sentiments, stories, and recollections. Many of you have inquired about a service. We have decided to have an open “Celebration of Life” on March 16th from 11:00 to 2:00 at the Riverside International Automotive Museum, 815 Marlborough, Riverside, CA 92507 (951)369-6966. We welcome all, but ask that you please RSVP as soon as possible, to Norma Jordan at the museum by phone or email: daveynormajordan@hughes.net   As a personal favor to me and my family, I am asking that if you have a personal “Rem” story, poignant or funny, or anything in between, please take a moment to write it down for us. I want my children, and my future grandchildren to be able to know my Dad. You can email it to me, or bring it with you. We will treasure them, I assure you. We all look forward to seeing you, and sharing our memories of my Dad. Sincerely, Kati (Remington) Blackledge

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I remember my first local drag race at National Trail Raceway when I was only 11 (1968) like it was yesterday. We watched local racers like "Ohio" George Montgomery, Larry Morgan, Jeg Coughlin Sr, Bob Riffle, K.S. Pittman, Jim Thompson and many others whose uncorked headers shook the hills of central Ohio like a spring thunder storm. I was HOOKED.  My brother and I had no money, so we hitchhiked over 30 miles to the track and snuck under the fence to gain access to the pits and racers. A lot changed over the years as Steve eventually worked for JEGS, Gil Kirk's Rod Shop, Scott Griffen motorsports and other racers. He will soon retire from General Electric's nuclear power division as a welding engineer after 25+ years. 
   The attached photo is the first dragster I saw at National Trails, driven by Gordon "Collecting" Collett, a hometown hero who dominated Top Gas in the 1960's. Steve and I eventually became "sweat for admission" pit crew members for Gordon; a true legend of the sport who often raced your host today, Connie "The Bounty Hunter" Kalitta, back in the day. We used to hide in Gordon's trailer entering race tracks to avoid paying admission fees since racing funds were tight. Yes, I know I'm old. If your son's first drag race at Phoenix was half as great as mine, I'm sure he will be a quarter-mile fan for life. Glad you got the VIP treatment you deserve, rather than sneaking in like Steve and I had to do; you could not have a better host than Bob Lawson and all the great folks at Kalitta Racing. Eric Studer
   Eric: Thank you for the memories. It is stories like this that means so much to the next generation and I encourage all our members to start writing down and sharing these stories with others, especially their families.

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Staff notes: The following came from Jessica Clark and the SLSRH Newsletter could not process this information fast enough to let you all know about her interview, but perhaps you can find something about it on the internet.
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   Tonight, at 6:00PM PS (February 20, 2013), I will be one of three female racers to participate in the very first FRN Google Plus Video Hangout. Jennifer Jo Cobb may even make a special guest appearance. Stop by the Google Plus FRN Hangout if you have a chance, or send in some questions to www.FemaleRacingNews.com, that you would like me to answer. Here is a link to the Hangout: https://plus.google.com/events/c3s82m08qeujd6cgqglnip7nbk8. I am so excited to have this opportunity thanks to Amanda Martin and Race4Girls. Jessica Clark Racing, P.O. Box 2933, Ventura, California 93001, www.JessicaClarkRacing.com.

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Staff notes: The following men have been honored for their racing exploits and should be prime examples to our members to reach out and try and complete biographies for them if they haven’t already been done.                         
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FARKONAS-COIL-MINICK ADVERTISEMENT; The Chicago-based trio of John Farkonas, Austin-Coil (driver), and Pat Minick, of course, owned the “Chi-Town Hustler” Dodge Funny Cars. Arguably, the “Hustler” in terms of show, may have been the most important car ever campaigned. Minick’s huge 300- to 400-foot super smoker burnouts revolutionized the sport, forcing anyone who campaigned a blown nitro car to follow suit. Minick was the team driver from 1967 through the 1971 winning countless match race titles. The team didn’t get its first hot rod association accolades until 1974 when Ron Colson won the IHRA bauble. 
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PAT FOSTER; Pat Foster never drove a car without a blower, beginning in 1964 through 1980. His first race car assignment was the Beaver Bros. blown Chevy Top Fueler, followed by cars as disparate as Roy Fjastad’s “Anteater” AA/MFC, the Atlas Tool Spl. Of John Bateman (AA/FD), and Funny Cars like Don Cook’s “Damn Yankee,” Mickey Thompson’s Mach-1 Mustang, Barry Setzer’s Vega, “the Chicago Patrol” Mustang II, Amos Satterlee’s “Super Chief,” and the Super Shops Arrow, a car in which he became the third driver ever to run a Funny Car “five.” His only NHRA win came in Funny Car (Setzer’s Vega) at the 1973 Gatornationals. 
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GAPP & ROUSH; While Jack Roush went on to bigger and better things in roundy-round racing, Livonia, Michigan product Wayne Gapp was the driving son-of-a-gun of this duo. The team lasted from roughly 1972 through 1978. In that frame, Gapp was the 1973 NHRA and 1974 IHRA World Pro Stock champions and had scored NHRA wins as vaunted as the 1973 Summernationals and 1975 U.S. Nationals titles. 
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DON GARLITS; Thirty-five NHRA national event wins, including eight U.S. Nationals titles, three NHRA World Championships, 25 IHRA National event wins and three IHRA world titles, and 10 AHRA world titles. 
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BOB GLIDDEN; The greatest Ford drag racer ever! A 10-time NHRA Pro Stock world champ and one-time IHRA world champ. He also scored 85 NHRA national event wins and still holds the NHRA consecutive race win mark at nine. 

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Great NHRA video from the late 1950's called "Ingenuity In Action."  Old school; 27 minute video put together by Hot Rod magazine in 1958 about going to the National Drags in Detroit.  See http://thechicaneblog.com/2013/01/09/ingenuity-in-action/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_me dium=email&utm_campaign=Feed:+TheChicane+%28The+Chicane%29.  Rick Gold

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Staff notes: The following information comes from Ginny Dixon of the Fabulous 50’s.
   LEGENDS OF RIVERSIDE: The 2013 edition of the Legends of Riverside Racing Film Festival and Gala will be staged March 23, 2013 at the Riverside International Automotive Museum in Riverside, California. The fifth annual event will honor racing great Bob Bondurant. Bob is not only the honoree at Legends V in 2013, but his school turns 45 years old and Bob himself turns 80 years young. AutoWeek has named Bob as one of the Americans most influential in the automotive industry.
   Bob will be joined at the 2013 Legends of Riverside Racing Film Festival by close to 50 veteran drivers. Legends V will include special awards presented to those who contributed so much to our racing heritage, a silent auction of assorted racing memorabilia, an autograph signing by drivers and VIPs (for ticket holders only), cocktail party, dinner, a live auction and interview by Ed Justice Jr with Bob Bondurant. In addition, there will also be a ‘Meet and Greet’ on Friday evening, March 22, for all ticket holders.
   Only 150 tickets are available to the public and proceeds will go to The Boys Republic. The 2013 Legends of Riverside will be held at the Riverside International Automotive Museum, 815 Marlborough Avenue, #200, Riverside, California 92507. Tickets for the 2 day event are $149.00 each. For more information, call 951-369-6966 or visit riversideinternational.org.   
   Sir Patrick Stewart on Sir Stirling Moss, a magnificent hour well spent. Go online to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UtRWhP QVAY8
   Art Evans said, “I put together a Pictorial Remembrance of John Fitch. You can get it by going online to www.sportscardigest.com/johnfitch. It consists of 100 or so photographs telling the story of his life (as best I could). You may want to consider subscribing to www.SportsCarDigest.com. It’s an online weekly and it’s free. I wrote an article on John that was in the January/February edition of
Vintage Motorsport. Parnelli Jones will be honored in a celebration of the 50th anniversary of his victory in the 1963 Indy 500 during ‘Legends Day’ on May 25, 2013 at the Speedway. Jones will drive the same Offy Roadster in a parade lap accompanied by 34 other Indy front-engine roadsters.” 
   Mary O'Connor remembered, by Bill Pollack. “In the late 1940’s, the arrival of beautiful little cars that were fun to drive and great to look at began arriving from Great Britain and Europe. These wonderful toys attracted a lot of people and they were a lot of fun to play with. Very soon the idea occurred that maybe a car club was a good idea. The soon to be formed California Sports Car Club was going to come to life, only most of the members just wanted to play. No one wanted to work. So who showed up at that moment was a young woman named Mary O'Connor. Mary was a wizard at this job and found a source of enthusiastic workers in the multitude of sports car clubs that existed in many of the large companies in the Southland. There were MG clubs, Jaguar clubs, Healy clubs and so forth to help make these events successful,” Pollack said.
   “Mary was able to coordinate and anticipate the various projects and needs from making lunches for the corner workers to finding tech inspectors and Ham radio buffs to communicate around the track long before we had mobile phones. The job was really 24 hours a day, 7 days a week during racing season, which in Southern California was mostly the whole year,” Pollack added. 
   “I knew Mary for a little over 60 years. I found out later it was her first job. I can't imagine anybody stepping into the situation she found where she literally had to invent everything because no one had done anything like it before. She was truly a miracle worker and it was this sort of an unbelievable ability that stayed with her for her entire life. It was responsible for her other successes and literally running the operations of Playboy Mansion. But for me, Mary was just a wonderful person. Very kind and very understanding and managed to keep control of her emotions pretty much most of the time and yet hardboiled mechanics and drivers who were upset about something or other soon found themselves up against the Stonewall Jackson of sports car racing,” Pollack continued.
   “Mary's greatest strength of character (which I respected enormously) was to convince everybody she met that she was their best friend. Over the years, I met so many people that said Mary was their best friend. I can't imagine anything nicer to say about anyone than those simple remarks, “she was my best friend.” I loved her and I will miss her. Mary Hefley Hauser O’Connor passed away on February 8, 2013. She was born Mary Eugenia Feuchtinger in 1928,” Pollack concluded. 
   PHIL REMINGTON, by All American Racers. Chatting with Dan Gurney the other day, he remarked, “When there’s a really knotty problem, call Rem.” I’ve also heard Carroll Shelby articulate something similar. During the sixties at Shelby American and afterwards at Dan Gurney’s All American Racers, Phil Remington was a key employee, one who everyone relied on to solve mechanical dilemmas.
   Phil was born in Santa Monica, California in 1921. He went to Santa Monica High School and then, Santa Monica Junior College (now Community College) where he majored in math and engineering. In 1940, he went to work at Northrop Aviation. When the war came along, he joined the Army where he spent the duration in the Air Corps as an engineer on bombers. 
   After mustering out in 1946, Rem worked at a number of different automotive related mechanical jobs. In Los Angeles, he worked for Amel Dietch on midgets and champ cars. Next, he went to San Francisco and was four years with Stirling Edwards, after which he went back to L.A. and worked for Hilborn.
   In 1958, Lance Reventlow developed his new Scarab and Phil went to work for him, first at the Culver City facility and then in Venice. By 1962, Reventlow was phasing out and Carroll Shelby took over the Venice facility along with Lance’s personnel: Simone and Warren Olson plus Rem. For the entire life of Shelby American, Phil was the chief engineer. First, he worked on the ACs as they came from England, turning them into Cobras. The first race he was involved in was also the Cobra’s first at Riverside in October 1962, when Bill Krause was way out in front when an axle on the Cobra broke.
   Remington says his favorite project was the 289 cid Ford GT. He spent a lot of time in England working with Eric Broadley on the prototype. During that period, he also helped supervise at the AC factory. In addition, Phil was involved with the Daytona Coupe project right from the start. Summing up his years with Shelby, Remington said, “We came up with a car that could beat Corvettes and Ferraris, and we brought some respectability to American racing.” In 1969, Shelby American was phasing down and would finally close its door the following year. Remington went to work with Dan Gurney at his All American Racers, where he worked until his death on February 9, 2013. He left his daughter, Kati, and three grandchildren.

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Staff notes: It must be true; Irwindale Speedway is back in business. I just received the following information from Doug Stokes who is the new Vice President of Communications for Irwindale Event Center which includes; Irwindale Speedway, Irwindale Dragstrip, Advanced Driving Dynamics, LA Racing Experience, and LA Karting Experience. Doug can be reached at doug@irwindaleeventcenter.com, Irwindale Event Center, 626-358-1100, 500 Speedway Drive, Irwindale, California 91706. We are waiting patiently for reports to come in from Doug on the dragstrip and oval track and it will be good to see Tim Kennedy's column regularly at www.hotrodhotline.com again.

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One of my articles that I wrote was on my friend, Olympic Bike rider Linda Jackson. I heard that she had a head-on collision with a car while riding her bike and is now trying to recover at Stanford Hospital. She is a strong woman and I wish her the best in her recovery. She was the first person that I wrote an article on and a wonderful person. I first met her when I was installing blinds in her home. She had half a dozen beautiful dogs that she cherished. I learned a lesson though; never leave your car door open. The dogs ate my lunch with I turned my back on them and left my car door open. When I first saw her, she had just come from a very intense bike ride, and I was impressed by her extreme workout. Her favorite car is a 1969 white Corvette. I would like to say that she gave me the jumpstart to work with the Society of Land Speed Racing Historians Newsletters. Spencer Simon

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Tom Fritz Art Gallery now through March 1st, 2013 all my art orders over $250 will ship with a signed and dated sheet of USPS FOREVER Muscle Cars Stamps. Shop the Website: www.fritzart.com. Contact Stephanie@fritzart.com for help selecting art gifts.  Tom Fritz, P.O. Box 800 Newbury Park, California 91319.

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Attached is pdf file (Click for PDF) containing a press release regarding a new sponsor of the project to restore Europe’s first dragster – Sydney Allard’s 1961 Allard Chrysler owned by the National Motor Museum, Beaulieu. Text is available in a Word Doc and all pics as jpgs so please contact me if you require different formats. The attached jpg by Matt Woods shows the dragster as it appeared last summer. The completed project will be handed back to the museum on June 16, 2013.  The remote starter trolley referred to in the release is an important part of the project; with the car being initially fired up on methanol before switching to the on-board tank containing nitro-methane.”
     February 2013. Alongside the restoration work being carried out on Europe’s first dragster – Sydney Allard’s 1961 Allard Chrysler owned by the National Motor Museum, Beaulieu - Allard Chrysler Action Group (ACAG) Team Leader Bob Roberts has been designing and sourcing the parts required for the team’s remote starter trolley.  As well as a battery pack, this features a pressurised methanol system with the methanol being stored in a previously donated Mooneyes fuel tank.  But the ACAG needed a pressure tank so he contacted drag racing fan Mick Dowd of CPE Pressure Vessels.
     The company specialises in carbon steel and stainless steel vessels and pipework in 304L, 316L, Duplex, Super Duplex, and 6mo, etc.  They have recently completed a new purpose-built workshop in Tamworth with 20 tonne lifting capability. They can manufacture vessels up to 30,000 litre capacity with pressures ranging from mains pressure to 1100 barg and they supply the oil and gas industry along with businesses in petrochemicals, water and pharmaceuticals etc.  A link to their website can now be found on the links page of www.allardchrysler.org.
     Mick has been attending Santa Pod since 1978 when he used to crew on the Wild Honey competition altered. He really came up trumps for the restoration project; not only supplying a stainless air tank but also a pressure gauge, safety valve and tap.  He said, "I have been following the amazing Allard Chrysler dragster restoration since it was first announced. When Bob contacted me about the pressure requirements for their starter trolley we were only too happy to oblige by supplying our 10 litre capacity 316L stainless steel polished vessel. I find it truly inspiring what the guys at the Allard Chrysler Action Group have achieved – all on a voluntary basis."
     ACAG Chair Brian Taylor said, "
It’s great to keep announcing new supporters of our project. Individual product sponsors have been a vital aspect of progressing the work – providing expertise as well as product. This starter trolley is going to be one of the flashiest at the drag strip."  For further information or the release in a different format with jpg attachments contact; Brian Taylor – Chairman, Allard Chrysler Action Group, Tel 01395 579733,
brian@allardchrysler.org, www.allardchrysler.org

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Pictures of the '32 Ford Roadster I owned back in the late '40's and early '50.
Marshall Ribilio

The pix with BR/43 was the '55 NHRA Safety Safari race in Halls, Tn.
The picture with tho old man in front of my house was 3 years ago when the present owner, restorer, brought it to Memphis to let me drive it around the block.
The present owner is an old time friend of mine's son, Bill Payne.
There is a long interesting story about this car. I owned it twice, drove it on the street, raced it, restored to show quality, raced it again. Originally from California, a beautiful car with top, side curtains, cycle front fenders, Stewart Warner dash, cool upholstery, column shift, Kelsey wheels and a flathead V8.
Probably been through eight to ten owners and still running strong.
The car ran at the NHRA nationals in Okla City. One of these days I am going to do a folder with the detail story of this car with some of the many pictures I have of it.

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