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SOCIETY OF LAND SPEED RACING HISTORIANS
NEWSLETTER 279 - April 25, 2013
Editor: Richard Parks, Rnparks1@Juno.com 
President of the Society: Jim Miller, 1-818-846-5139.
Photographic Editor of the Society
: Roger Rohrdanz, beachtruck@juno.com
Northern California Reporter: Spencer Simon, sparklecraftspecial@yahoo.com
Field Reporter/Historian: Bob Falcon, RFalcon500@aol.com

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Some Names To Look For In This Newsletter:
Guest Editorial, by Dyno Don Batyi; Assigned Staff Editorial, by Richard Parks; STAFF NOTES: Roger Rohrdanz and I visited Jack Underwood in the nursing home where he was assigned by his physician; There will be a service for Leo Dempsey, in the chapel of Pacific View Memorial Park in Newport Beach (Corona Del Mar above Marguerite Street), California on Tuesday, April 23, 2013 at 2 PM; The name of the book that I had with me at the Santa Ana Airport Drag Strip Reunion is called MERCHANTS OF SPEED, by Paul. D. Smith; The Automobile Driving Museum (ADM) located, in the shadow of LAX, at 610 Lairport Street, El Segundo announced that they are once again teaming with Force Interlink, publisher of HOT ROD magazine and CAR CRAFT magazine, in the presentation of a monthly Car Cruise Night at the museum facility; El Mirage Dry Lake Spring Clean-Up.  On Saturday, May 4, 2013, El Mirage OHV Area will be holding its 14th annual El Mirage Spring Clean-up; Tune in to http://www.victorylaneradio.com/, April 17, 2013 at 7:30 EST (4:30 California time). I have been given the opportunity to be on their radio show and I look forward to answering some questions from the show's fans in my 15 minute segment; Staff Notes: I just wanted to let you know that Jack Lawford Jr will not be with www.Bikerhotline.com after June, 2013; These are the photographs taken at the Dry Lakes Racing Hall of Fame Induction on Saturday, April 20, 2013; I am presenting a seminar to benefit the Studebaker National Museum in South Bend on Friday night, May 3, 2013; Vendor and vehicle registration for Moldy Marvin's 13th Annual Rat Fink. Party & Kustom Kulture Extravaganza & Charity, Art Auction and Panel Jam for the Painted Turtle, July 27, 2013; Harold and Nancy LeMay amassed the largest privately owned collection of automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, other vehicles and related memorabilia in the world; Cruisin' For A Cure Presented by Debbie Baker, Ross Kroenert and over 125 volunteers; I hope now is that the October meet (Santa Ana Airport Drag Strip and Main Street Malt Shop Reunion) is on the 12th; My Dad raced Jalopy's from 1953-1956 in Southern California; NHRA 2013 Holley National Hot Rod Reunion Grand Marshal & Honorees; POWER SITTING. By Le Roi Tex Smith; Gone Racin’ to… Jack’s Garage. Story by Richard Parks, photographs by Roger Rohrdanz. Revised October 6, 2006; STAFF NOTES: the following came from www.hotrodhotline.com; STAFF NOTES; the following newsletter comes from Gale Banks and if anyone would like to get on his mailing list go to gbanks@bankspower.com and request that they add your email address to their list; Event posters celebrate Aston Martin and Porsche 911, By Kandace Hawkinson. PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. (April 16, 2013); Barringer pictures from Spencer; Dear Mr. Parks, I'm Stu Hanssen and my Dad raced this car--the 3rd and last Baldwin Special

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Guest Editorial, by Dyno Don Batyi:  (The following letter was received by Rand Paul, US Senator. The staff extends to any of our members the right to send in a Guest Editorial and share their thoughts on a hot rodding or straight-line racing issue).
   Thank you for taking the time to contact me regarding the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) and the development of ethanol. For years, the corn ethanol and cellulosic bio fuels industries have received significant support from the federal government in the form of use mandates, tax incentives, tariffs and subsidies as well as loan guarantees and grant programs. Such market-distorting policies often have unintended consequences; for example, there is concern that the RFS, “a federal mandate that requires every gallon of gasoline be blended with a certain percentage of ethanol,” has artificially inflated the price of corn across the board.
  Others worry that increasing this blend percentage may negatively affect some older, smaller engines on motorcycles and outdoor equipment. Additionally, federal production targets for cellulosic ethanol (bio fuels that use feed stocks other than corn) have thus far proven to be little more than wishful thinking. On January 25, 2012, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the Environmental Protection Agency's methodology in projecting cellulosic ethanol volumes under the RFS had no basis in reality; the EPA predicted that 6.6 million gallons would be produced in the U.S. in 2011, when in fact the actual output for that year was zero. Refiners subject to the RFS cellulosic ethanol blend mandate at that time, the Court asserted, were thus being penalized for not using a fuel that essentially did not exist. After 30 years of government support, it is time for ethanol and every other form of energy to compete in the market; on their own. Rand Paul, MD, United States Senator.

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Assigned Staff Editorial, by Richard Parks
   Recently I had a discussion with a fellow journalist who told me some disturbing news. He had several bad episodes with staff members at a museum in Southern California that made it hard for him to do his job. The reason for the creation of the Society of Land Speed Racing Historians (SLSRH) was to bring together individuals, mostly volunteers, who would work to help such museums in whatever way that they could. Journalists, reporters, photographers, and historians are respected here in the SLSRH.  Some of you are amateur historians in the sense that you simply love history. Others are working historians and media people who make a living, or try to make a living, at what they love to do. Some of us are self-trained, such as Jim Miller, who is one of the best automotive racing historians we have. Others are former editors, writers, and journalists who are still doing what they love. Many of our members are collectors who make their knowledge available to others. There are professionally trained historians who majored in the subject in college who are members of our society.
   We are a large group and each of us has talents that we use to keep our history and heritage alive. We all look up to people from the past that have inspired us. I admire Eric Rickman, Dick Wells, Wally Parks, LeRoi Tex Smith, Bud Lang, Jim Murray, Shav Glick, Chris Economaki and many others who set the high marks that we all try and emulate in our own way. None of these men would ever, in any way, insult or impair the efforts of journalists to do their jobs. My father would have taken an employee, racing official, timing association volunteer, or friend aside and explained to them how important it is to generate good will with the media. He held Shav Glick in such high esteem that he named the Media Center at the NHRA Pomona Raceway track after Shav. The journalists appreciated the support that Wally Parks gave them. He gave them the courtesy of his time for their interviews and saw to it that they were supplied with an outlet for their laptops, provided snacks, and water. He made available any brochures that they needed to help them write their stories. Dad made sure that we had as many journalists on hand as wanted to come.
   Over time, with the passing of these original journalists and the officials who welcomed them, a new breed of officials took over racing organizations, in oval track, stock car, drag racing, LSR, sports car and other forms of racing and they instituted new policies. They no longer always saw journalists as people who could help them attract fans and paying spectators or make their racing better known to the public. Instead, these new officials saw the Media as freeloaders who took revenue from them in some form or another. “You didn’t buy a ticket so why should we give you a free brochure,” they would complain. “We have a track photographer who pays us a fee to take photographs and so you are taking away our revenue,” they complained. “You write for a website that has only 1000 members, how can you help us,” they argued. When I used to belong to AARWBA, one of the biggest complaints by the members was that they couldn’t get access. They weren’t allowed to cover events, couldn’t get credentials, or access to the racing teams. It was tough to get access to the starting line or get interviews with the drivers. I never heard of this happening when my father was in charge. He simply welcomed everyone, as far as I could see.
   I’ve been thrown out of my share of events. I expect that. A good reporter is one who pushes the envelope and goes after a story wherever it can be found. I’m proud of the record of toss-outs that I’ve achieved. You are known by the places you are asked to leave. But in the old days at least we got a smile with the heave-ho and we understood that we went too far. Today the smile of officials has been replaced with a frown and a perpetual, “you’re not welcome here.” This may explain why there are so many blogs and websites and some printed publications that specialize in “hate journalism.” That’s the kind of site that only looks to tear down a racing organization. I’ve been approached to tell them what I know, but if what I say is positive they won’t report it and if it is salacious and negative then their ears pop up and they’re ready to hear all that’s bad. When you limit access you create bad feelings with journalists and though they love the sports they are writing on, they can’t help but be embittered in how they were treated. It’s hard to talk to these new officials because we lack the one key ingredient they need most; money. We simply work on a shoestring budget and we can’t give them royalties to work at their track or buy tickets to their events and then go and cover it too.
   I try to do what I can; I’ve purchased books to review them, or bought tickets to some events. But I can’t do this for ever book or movie that I review. I also can’t buy tickets to every event that I cover. I’m already overspent on my budget. If an event is small and the organizer is facing a loss then I buy a ticket. If it’s a big event like the L.A. Roadster Show or the Grand National Roadster Show then my policy is that you give me credentials and then let me go to work to finish my articles. Roger and I usually are in and out quickly if it’s a small show, like the Easyriders in January. If it’s a big show like the Grand Nationals we might end up doing five or six stories and spend the better part of three days there. What promoters don’t know is that it takes Roger days to photograph, prepare and caption his photographs. It takes me at least a day to cover the show and write the article. At ten dollars an hour it would be much cheaper for us to just buy a ticket, have fun and forget doing our articles. We do what we do for the love of the sport, not for the money, if there is any money to be made.
   So I’m writing this editorial to let officials know that they need to have a better attitude towards the Media. Look at the Media as a friend and ally and not as credential abusers. I know that some photographers and writers have taken advantage of their status. When that happens you let them know the consequences of their actions. However, if they are simply doing their job in a professional manner then let them do it. Don’t hassle them over an unused program. Don’t be unfriendly. Don’t be hard to deal with. Don’t frown and give us attitude. If you do then what we write may not be what you want to hear. 

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STAFF NOTES; Roger Rohrdanz and I visited Jack Underwood in the nursing home where he was assigned by his physician. Jack broke his foot in a fall and injured his ribs and he is sore right now. He will be released in a few days. In the meantime his good wife is opening up Jack’s Garage to allow the “Regulars” to come and bench race. If you are a racer of any stripe you need to make a trip to Jack’s Garage (a real garage in a housing tract) and meet all the guys that show up there. It’s a chance to meet some well-known and much respected hot rodders, LSR, drag and oval track drivers, mechanics and fans of the sport. I have an article at www.hotrodhotline.com, guest columnist/Richard Parks entitled JACK’S GARAGE. I’ve also included it in this issue of the newsletter.
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The SLSRH Newsletter comes out about every two weeks, so some things that we mention concerning CURRENT events are often over by the time the newsletter goes into publication. I visited Jack on Thursday, April 18, a day after he was discharged from the nursing home. He is home, in bed, recuperating from a nasty fall. Anita Underwood is keeping the garage open for Jack’s Garage Regulars who are still coming by to benchrace and keep the spirit of the group going.

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There will be a service for Leo Dempsey, in the chapel of Pacific View Memorial Park in Newport Beach (Corona Del Mar above Marguerite Street), California on Tuesday, April 23, 2013 at 2 PM. Sent in by Jack and Nita Underwood.
   Staff notes: Roger Rohrdanz and I attended the services and will have a story for you soon on Leo, who raced in the 1950’s at Bonneville.

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The name of the book that I had with me at the Santa Ana Airport Drag Strip Reunion is called MERCHANTS OF SPEED, by Paul. D. Smith. It has a lot of information about hundreds of people. You can find it on amazon.com for $29.30 new or $18.25 used.  Janet Iskenderian Griebenow

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The Automobile Driving Museum (ADM) located, in the shadow of LAX, at 610 Lairport Street, El Segundo announced that they are once again teaming with Force Interlink, publisher of HOT ROD magazine and CAR CRAFT magazine, in the presentation of a monthly Car Cruise Night at the museum facility. The events will be held on the last Friday night of each month from 5 PM to 8 PM with the final scheduled for October 25, 2013. A Saturday Cruise Day is also scheduled for Saturday, December 14, 2013 from 1 PM to 4 PM. There will be food services available and the museum’s collection of near 200 Showroom Condition cars, from air cooled Franklin's and Ford Model T's to one of a kind Packard's and Cadillac's for a small admittance donation. 
   ADM's staff of docents will be on duty to answer any questions viewers have about the collection. The visiting cars will be displayed, angle parked-facing outward, on both sides of Lairport Street and the street is blocked for through traffic. Visiting cars usually range from a 1934 Plymouth in showroom condition to a few Ferrari's and whatever else shows up.  This season marks the second year for this gathering. 
   ADM also formally announced that they will once again stage their annual Automotive Literature and Collectibles Expo on the last Sunday in June. Space applications are now available. It should be noted that in many years past this annual date has been confined to feature publications that concern antique autos only but now ADM has opened the participation to all forms of Automobilia and motor sports. There is also free selling space available for any published author to sell and sign their books. To reserve your "Author's Corner" space contact Bob Falcon at Scribblerbob@aol.com. Attendance at both mentioned events is free of charge. For more information please contact Bob Falcon or Jodee at jodeeh@theadm.org.

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El Mirage Dry Lake Spring Clean-Up.  On Saturday, May 4, 2013, El Mirage OHV Area will be holding its 14th annual El Mirage Spring Clean-up.  The day will start off with breakfast at 7AM ($3 donation). Registration begins at 7:30AM, and work crews will head out to begin work at 8AM and stay out until 12 Noon. A BBQ lunch will be served at 12:30PM, with raffle drawings and the 50/50 drawing beginning at 1PM.  SCTA is always an active participant in this event and encourages all Clubs and members to participate.     http://www.elmirage.org/foem/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=90:2013-spring-clean-up-day&catid=1:friends-of-el-mir.  From Jerry Cornelison, Road Runners - SCTA (est 1937), http://www.ussarcherfish.com/roadrunners. The Automobile Driving Museum (ADM) located, in the shadow of LAX, at 610 Lairport Street, El Segundo announced that they are once again teaming with Force Interlink, publisher of HOT ROD magazine and CAR CRAFT magazine, in the presentation of a monthly Car Cruise Night at the museum facility. The events will be held on the last Friday night of each month from 5 PM to 8 PM with the final scheduled for October 25, 2013. A Saturday Cruise Day is also scheduled for Saturday, December 14, 2013 from 1 PM to 4 PM. There will be food services available and the museum’s collection of near 200 Showroom Condition cars, from air cooled Franklin's and Ford Model T's to one of a kind Packard's and Cadillac's for a small admittance donation. 
   ADM's staff of docents will be on duty to answer any questions viewers have about the collection. The visiting cars will be displayed, angle parked-facing outward, on both sides of Lairport Street and the street is blocked for through traffic. Visiting cars usually range from a 1934 Plymouth in showroom condition to a few Ferrari's and whatever else shows up.  This season marks the second year for this gathering. 
   ADM also formally announced that they will once again stage their annual Automotive Literature and Collectibles Expo on the last Sunday in June. Space applications are now available. It should be noted that in many years past this annual date has been confined to feature publications that concern antique autos only but now ADM has opened the participation to all forms of Automobilia and motor sports. There is also free selling space available for any published author to sell and sign their books. To reserve your "Author's Corner" space contact Bob Falcon at Scribblerbob@aol.com. Attendance at both mentioned events is free of charge. For more information please contact Bob Falcon or Jodee at jodeeh@theadm.org

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Tune in to http://www.victorylaneradio.com/, April 17, 2013 at 7:30 EST (4:30 California time). I have been given the opportunity to be on their radio show and I look forward to answering some questions from the show's fans in my 15 minute segment. Jessica Clark, www.JessicaClarkRacing.com.
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If you weren't able to catch the radio interview last night, here is the link! Fast forward to 37:50 and that will put you at the beginning of my 15 minute segment! It was a great experience to be on the show! http://www.blogtalkradio.com/vlf1/2013/04/17/all-wheel-live-is-on-at-7pm-nascars-timmy-hill.  Jessica Clark

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Staff Notes: I just wanted to let you know that Jack Lawford Jr will not be with www.Bikerhotline.com after June, 2013.  He has gone back into the real estate business.  He owned a Home Inspection business for eight years; the largest in the state of Idaho.  We called on him to help us out with Bikerhotline when we were getting it started.  Jack is a Real Estate Broker; one with a much different perspective than most agents and he knows this area very well.  His website is www.JackLawford.com, so if you know of anyone who is thinking about moving to Idaho have them give Jack a call. Idaho is a wonderful place to live and 25% of the people buying houses here are from California.  There are also many from Oregon and Washington but California tops the list.  Mary Ann Lawford, publisher www.landspeedracing.com.  
    
Mary Ann: I will pass on the word.  My son lived in Boise and it is indeed a very scenic area and has lots of land for shops and houses, which appeals to hot rodders.

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These are the photographs taken at the Dry Lakes Racing Hall of Fame Induction on Saturday, April 20, 2013.  They are posted at www.oilstick.com; go to the gas Up Photos 2013. Or google this link; http://solvangca.com/oilstick.com/2013GasUp/index.htm, and it will go to the index page of the photos. This year a couple of people took the camera from me and put me in the photos.   Evelyn Roth

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I am presenting a seminar to benefit the Studebaker National Museum in South Bend on Friday night, May 3, 2013. Complete details including panel participants can be found at http://www.avantithunderatbonneville.com.  I would appreciate it if you could get the word out.  A special Avanti event at the Studebaker National Museum "A 50th Anniversary Celebration: Avanti Style & Speed on the race track  - Seminar Friday May 3, 2013 – Studebaker National Museum  2013 marks the 20th Anniversary of Ron Hall’s 200 MPH run at Bonneville in his 1963 Studebaker Avanti.  Hull-O Ventures, in association with the Chicagoland Chapter of the AOAI and Michiana Chapter of the SDC will host a seminar at the Studebaker National Museum. The purpose of this event is to commemorate Ron’s achievement as well as celebrate Studebaker and other Avanti racers history at Bonneville. The proceeds from this event will be donated to the Studebaker National Museum.  We have assembled an outstanding panel to discuss these topics.                  
     Richard Bennett III – Owner/Historian of the Due Cento since 1968                 
     John Hora – Founder of the AOAI and owner of the #9 Bonneville Avanti                 
     John Shanahan – Studebaker Historian/Ron Hall Team Member                 
     Jim Lange – Bonneville racer and record holder                 
     Jim Pepper and other Ron Hall’s Bonneville team members/participants.                 
     George Krem – Studebaker Historian/Ron Hall Team Member                 
     Dave Kinney – Moderator.
Additionally Ron Hall’s Bonneville Avanti, John Hora’s #9 Studebaker Bonneville Avanti, and a 1963 Avanti will be on display at the museum.  The event will require a separate charge for admission. Museum membership does NOT qualify for this event. It is a separate fundraiser. SEATING WILL BE LIMITED TO 120. Registration Fee for this event is $25.50 which INCLUDES museum admission (whether a museum member or not) and includes a commemorative limited edition magazine of the Avanti at Bonneville.  For information and tickets see John Hull – Hull-O Ventures, 2862 Stoney Creek Drive, Elgin, Illinois 60124. Or email me at John Hull avantifromct@aol.com.

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Vendor and vehicle registration for Moldy Marvin's 13th Annual Rat Fink. Party & Kustom Kulture Extravaganza & Charity, Art Auction and Panel Jam for the Painted Turtle, July 27, 2013. http://www.ratfinkparty.com/2013/main2.html. Moldy Marvin moldy@ratfink.org.

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Harold and Nancy LeMay amassed the largest privately owned collection of automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, other vehicles and related memorabilia in the world. At its peak, the LeMay Collection numbered in excess of 3,000 vehicles and thousands of artifacts. LeMay is a local businessman from Tacoma, Washington. In 1998, Harold and Nancy LeMay formed the 501c3 charitable organization, The Harold E. LeMay Museum, now called LeMay – America’s Car Museum, and committed themselves to donating the vast LeMay Collection to the Museum for the benefit of the public. LeMay - America’s Car Museum was chartered to secure, preserve and interpret the valuable LeMay Collection, along with additional vehicles and artifacts that it may acquire, in order to explore the broad themes of American mobility and lifestyle in an instructive and entertaining manner. To schedule a tour of The LeMay collection, please email us at info@lemaymuseum.org or call 253-779-8490.

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Cruisin' For A Cure Presented by Debbie Baker, Ross Kroenert and over 125 volunteers. 14th Annual Show - Saturday, September 28, 2013, OC Fair & Events Center, Costa Mesa, CA. Supporting CITY of HOPE Prostate Cancer Program. 
   For 14 years now, Debbie Baker has been educating folks about prostate cancer with the best tool she can think of: a classic car show. Namely, the Cruisin' for a Cure event in Costa Mesa, CA which combines a huge custom/classic auto show with prostate cancer screenings to raise awareness about the disease and encourage early detection and prevention. "I call Cruisin' For A Cure the "Save Your Life" Car Show in California. It's the largest one day charity event in the nation with more than 3500 cars, old and new," explains Debbie. "Over the past 13 years we have tested more than 12,000 men for prostate cancer and have saved over 3,000 men from the disease they would not have known about had they not taken advantage of the free screenings at this event and others." 
   Debbie started the event after her husband was diagnosed with prostrate cancer. She and the team of volunteers and organizers want to make sure that the disease can be identified early. The event is held in September as part of Prostate Cancer Awareness month. She knew that the cars would bring in the crowds, and that the availability of the free screenings would certainly encourage attendees to get their numbers checked. The event has been so successful that a number of shows around the country have sprung up, like Car Show/Cancer Screening franchises. Cruisin' for a Cure is an all volunteer event, and to make sure the fundraising goes directly research, entry and participant checks are made out to the research institution itself. In this case, City of Hope Prostate Cancer Program in Orange County, CA. The event is supported by a number of outside sponsors as well including Meguiar's, Magnaglow, Firestone, America's tires, Interstate Batteries, Mac Tools, Mickey Thompson Tires amongst the 250 vendors. Dave McClellan, the voice of NHRA, acts as MC. 
   In addition to the car show, the event features live entertainment, food, and cruisin' lanes. But the most important facet is the screening component. Debbie will identify survivors and give them blue shirts to wear during the event as inspiration to the other attendees. The efforts are making a difference. "Men are starting to realize that prostate cancer is "not an old man's disease," Debbie explains. "It is claiming 207,000 lives a year. Getting a simple PSA blood test and tracking their numbers for comparison each year to see if they start to go up makes a difference. We are seeing prostate cancer now more and more in men in their early 40's and with more aggressive cancers too. They need to start screening now." 
   Debbie has words for the men directly, "You put oil in your cars, you check your radiators, why not check your own body with a simple blood test? If you want to do the complete exam, that's free too. Last year alone, 26 out of 186 men had a full exam, and came back with suspicious lumps. That exam literally saved their lives." The original Cruisin' for a Cure will be held September 28, 2013 at the OC Fair and Events center in Costa Mesa, CA. Check our events page to find out more about related events in other areas of the country. For more information, go to www.cruisinforacure.com.

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I hope now is that the October meet (Santa Ana Airport Drag Strip and Main Street Malt Shop Reunion) is on the 12th. I'll be down there for sure to attend my 40 year Garden Grove HS reunion that evening. I have attached an article from an October, 1953 HOT ROD magazine I was bringing with me that Leslie Long may not have in his collection. My mom was a high school friend of Joan Hart (C. J. and Peggy Hart’s daughter) and they sold hot dogs at the races in the 1950’s. I also ran across some 1950's magazines with your dad pictured in my collection that I was bringing with me. I was really looking forward to today (April 13) thinking that some of the people from the cancelled CRR (California Racers Reunion) meet would show also to make this gathering one of the biggest ever. If you see this in time perhaps you could print the attachments for Leslie and see if he is thinking October 12th for the next meet. I appreciate Leslie's reminder calls and your email updates on this event. You have my permission to post anything I send you. I cropped the Peggy Hart article so copy and/or post the attached instead of the previous ones. I added a picture of your dad from a December 1957 CAR CRAFT article. It was the 3rd annual NHRA championship in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. I look forward to reading your recap about last Saturday. Daryl Booth
   Daryl: I'll have the story in the next issue of the newsletter.

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My Dad raced Jalopy's from 1953-1956 in Southern California.  I have photographs of him racing and was wondering if you are interested in them.  His name was Nash Jimenez and he raced a 1932 Ford Coupe and Sedan and beat Parnelli Jones in 1955 in Carpenteria at the Thunderbowl raceway.  Also, any info you have of him would be appreciated.  Robert Jimenez
     Robert: Thank you for writing in.  I'm the acting editor for the Society of Land Speed Racing Historians Newsletter at www.landspeedracing.com and a guest columnist at www.hotrodhotline.com, where we have archived material on racing.  We only peripherally cover Jalopy racing, but we know all the people involved and I used to help Hila Sweet organize her Jalopy Reunion, which turned into the Car Racers Reunion and then into the California Racers Reunion.  The reunion this year was cancelled, but we hope to have a venue site so that we can continue the reunion.  I will add you to email list and notify you of this event.  You should also put the two websites on your list of favorites because that is where the announcements are posted. 
     The person most likely to help you is Tom Luce, the author of MEMORIES OF THE CALIFORNIA JALOPY ASSOCIATION.  Tom Luce's last email address was
t.luce@att.net.  He knows a lot of history and is committed to keeping Jalopy racing alive in the minds of those who were a part of that generation.  He also produced some VHS tapes under the same title in six volumes.  If you can't reach him let me know and I will try and contact him for you. 
     Two other men that could help you are Greg Sharp and Jim Miller.  Greg Sharp has a wide knowledge of car racing and is the curator/archivist at the Wally Parks NHRA Motorsports Museum in Pomona, California.  He can be reached through the switchboard at the museum by dialing 909-622-2133.  Jim Miller is the President of the Society of Land Speed Racing Historians and the main researcher for our group.  He is also the Director of the American Hot Rod Foundation (
www.ahrf.com) and his phone number is 818-846-5139.  He will be glad to talk to you.
     In addition I will post this in the next issue of our newsletter.  A good way to accumulate history is to write and then share it.  Start out with what you know about your father and those he raced with and against, who was on his crew and the races you know something about.  Send that to me with a few photos and I will post it.  You can serialize it and send as much as you wish to share.  What this does is jog the memories of our readers and they may respond to you or  me and I will post their comments. 
     But the most important thing for you to do is come to the California Racers Reunion and meet those men and women that your father knew.  I will forward this email to Hila Sweet and maybe she might know her father.  Your photographs are very important to researchers, but without captions and text to go along with them they are difficult to interpret.  These men and women are dedicated to preserving our motorsports heritage.  Before turning them over to anyone you should see if they can make copies so that you can keep the originals if you wish.  I know that Jim Miller will be glad to do that for you, or at least see that you have a disc.  The more groups that have copies the more likely they will survive into the future.  Finding a good home for historical objects is why our society was formed.  You are welcome to use this site whenever you wish. 

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NHRA 2013 Holley National Hot Rod Reunion Grand Marshal & Honorees.  NHRA Motorsports Museum. 
   Grand Marshal Preston Davis is considered one of the Southeast’s best fuel racers from the 1960’s and ‘70s. When Raymond Godman switched to Top Fuel racing he hired Davis to drive his Tennessee Bo Weevil. When Funny Cars took over match race bookings they built a Bo Weevil Funny Car as well. He won two Division Top Fuel Championships, a Division Funny Car Championship and is a member of the Division 2 Hall of Fame. 
   Alan Bockla was drag racing’s original king of the Rockies. In 1961 he began Top Fuel racing. A switch to a Woody Gilmore chassis and Chrysler power put him on the drag racing map with back-to-back West Central Division Top Fuel titles. He was first of the so-called mile-high drivers to run 170, 180, 190 and 200 mph. 
   Lynwood Dupuy is one of those rare officials beloved by drag racers coast to coast. Long before computers took their place in the tower, Lynwood’s attention to detail found him keeping records and figuring handicaps by hand. He’s one of those rare people that can perform nearly any function at a drag strip from starter to race director and earned the reputation as being firm but fair. 
   Melvin Heath built his fuel dragster in a shed on his Oklahoma watermelon farm. In 1956 he was first to win two NHRA Regional championships in a single season. At the second NHRA Nationals in Kansas City, Heath narrowly defeated Californian Bob Alsenz to win the dragster class and then took Top Eliminator honors over 351 other entries. 
   At 16 Jon Lundberg stood on an oil drum and announced his first drag race using a megaphone. By 1962 he was announcing at three Michigan tracks. He expanded to national events in 1963 including the legendary March Meet in Bakersfield. Nicknamed the “Voice of Drag Racing” and “Thunderlungs”, he appeared at more than 120 different drag strips between 1964 and 1978. Whenever “Attention in the pits!” is heard, drag race veterans think of Jon Lundberg. 
   Tom Prock has been involved in drag racing since the early ‘60s. He began with gassers and in the early ‘70s switched to Funny Cars. He raced the Warhorse Mustang, then teamed with Al Bergler on the Motown Shaker Vega. In late 1972 Tom joined Fred Castronovo and drove the successful Custom Body Challenger for the next five years. He retired from the wheel in 1979 to became crew chief for Tom “the Mongoose” McEwen. After six years he left the road to work for Venolia Pistons .   
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   NHRA Museum. The Wally Parks NHRA Motorsports Museum, presented by the Automobile Club of Southern California, long a dream of NHRA founder Wally Parks, opened to the public April 4, 1998, after years of planning and months of hard work cataloging and arranging the exhibit. Housed in a 28,500-square-foot building on the edge of the historic Los Angeles County Fairplex, the Wally Parks NHRA Motorsports Museum's mission is to celebrate the impact of motorsports on our culture. We collect, preserve, exhibit and interpret the vehicles, stories, and artifacts that represent our affection for, and the influence of, automotive speed and style in all its forms. We are the place to view and learn about hot rods, customs, racecars and speed records, and the West Coast's role as the historic center for their past and present development. The Museum features an impressive array of vintage and historical racing vehicles –- nearly 50 at the Grand Opening -- along with photographs, trophies, helmets and driving uniforms, artifacts, paintings, and other memorabilia chronicling more than 50 years of American motorsports. A gift shop offers a wide variety of souvenir items. The Museum is open during the annual Los Angeles County Fair. Please check the Fairplex website for hours of operation and admission prices (www.fairplex.com).
   Museum admission is just $1 with regular paid Fair admission ticket.  HOURS: Wednesday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Extended hours during the NHRA Winternationals and NHRA Finals. Also, hours change during the annual Los Angeles County Fair. HOLIDAYS WE ARE CLOSED: Easter, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas Day and New Year's Day. ADMISSION PRICES: Current NHRA members are admitted free. Admission for non-members is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors 60 and older, $6 for juniors 6 through 15, and free for children under the age of 5. AAA discount available. 
   HOW TO GET HERE: From the 10 Freeway east, exit White Avenue, proceed North, turn left on McKinley Avenue, enter Fairplex Gate 1. From the 210 Freeway, exit Fruit Avenue, proceed South, turn right on McKinley Avenue. The Wally Parks NHRA Motorsports Museum is located at Fairplex Gate 1, 1101 W. McKinley Avenue in Pomona. Call us at (909) 622-2133.  Wally Parks NHRA Motorsports Museum 1101 W. McKinley Ave. Building 3A Pomona CA, 91768 Museum Main Number: 909-622-2133 Museum Fax Number: 909-622-1206 Reunion Hotline: 909-622-8562, themuseum@nhra.com,    www.museum.nhra.com.

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POWER SITTING. By Le Roi Tex Smith 
   Back awhile, there was a comic strip named POGO, very popular because the animated possum and swamp friends had a way of striking at the very heart of the American psyche. One of Pogo’s exclamations that has lingered with me all these years was, “We have met the enemy and the enemy is us!” That is decidedly true of we traditional type hot rod enthusiasts. The merry go around has us right back at a time in our own history that we so pointedly derided thirty years ago. Namely, we are now a part of the lawn chair majority. Oh, whoa, oh whoa. As Pogo used said, we has found the enemy and the enemy is us! We are the brigades of nameless folding camp chairs, esconced in the shade, nodding half-asleep at the endless parade of shades of red deuce roadsters. Exactly when Power Parking and Power Sitting came in vogue, I’m not sure, but it must have been somewhere between Fifty Five and Sixty. No, not l955, I mean the Fifty Five in a person’s personal pantheon of passing years. Age. Winters. Seasons bygone era’s.

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Gone Racin’ to… Jack’s Garage. Story by Richard Parks, photographs by Roger Rohrdanz. Revised October 6, 2006.
  Jack’s Garage is located in Fountain Valley, California, and is just a car garage, like yours or mine, but considerably more cluttered. What makes it unique is that it is a throwback to an earlier time, some seven decades ago, when young men gathered in a garage, clubhouse or diner, to form their own hot rod car clubs. The very birth of hot rodding can be traced to the 1920’s and ’30’s, when high school teens formed their own groups, broadly centered on a neighborhood or street. In those days few people had garages, and many cars were parked in driveways, under carports or on the street. The typical hot rodders and shade tree mechanics would work on their cars in the open, or throw a rope or chain over a sturdy tree branch to make a usable hoist. Some families could afford a garage, though they discouraged their sons from turning it into a work area, for fear of disturbing the neighbors. Every so often, one of the young men would have a parent who would allow them to use it, and equally tolerant neighbors. That young man would usually be voted in as the club president for as long as he provided the garage. Over the years the car clubs, which numbered in the thousands, began to disappear, though the hot rod fervor only grew in strength and numbers. 
  Jack’s Garage is a modern day garage, on an unassuming cul-de-sac, that attracts men who remember those old days, and who show up every morning, seven days a week. They talk about cars, racing and the same sort of things that men of all ages have been talking about since the dawn of the automotive age. Jack Underwood is the unofficial club president, and he invites everyone to come, have a donut, a cup of coffee and talk about cars. The first order of business is to remove two Ford Roadsters, with unprimered metal, and stripped to the bare necessities, from the garage. His wife, Nita, and the other regulars assist ‘Big Jack,’ with his white hair, large Norwegian stature and good nature. The garage is a museum to engines, land speed racing, hot rodding and American car culture in particular. ‘Viking Jack,’ as he is sometimes called, is a member of the Dry Lakes Hall of Fame, located in Buellton, California, at the Gas Pump Museum, made famous by Jack Mendenhall. Underwood was inducted for his efforts to preserve the history and heritage of dry lakes, Bonneville and land speed racing. The garage has filing cabinets and bookcases filled with original and copied material that trace the history of land speed racing and other forms of American car culture. 
  Researchers are welcome to look at programs, books, photos, parts, and records that Jack and his “car club” friends have accumulated. Henry Astor, from the American Hot Rod Foundation (AHRF) draws upon Jack’s Garage for additional material for the museum and archives back in New York City, New York. There is more to Jack’s Garage than paper, books and programs. The garage is filled with people of interesting backgrounds who show up throughout the week. Bill Davis, Dan Hart, Steve McElroy, Joe Barnett, Ed Newett, Will Moore, Billy Jordan, George Steele, Jack Plymell, Vic King, Ron Phelps, John Swanson, Bob Schmidt, Norm Morrison, and Creighton Hunter, are some of the regulars to the garage. The wealth of experience that they possess in the automotive world is impressive. Many have raced at the dry lakes or Bonneville, built their own cars or have participated in oval track or other types of racing. Warren Bullis is the long time Secretary/Treasurer for the Southern California Timing Association (SCTA). Stan Chersky has a world class car club plaque collection with 4000 varieties. Gene and Alan Barbee, Ted Bowen, Bob Snook, and many others have deep roots in land speed racing. Other knowledgeable hot rodders that come on a regular basis are; Roger and Jimmy Underwood, Bob Anderson, Dave Gorges, Ted Loffler, Mikey Spacek, Roger Brophy, Leo Dempsey, Charlie Reno, Steve Rini, Ron Bell, Doug Wilson, Jim Duff, Ed Farrell and Chuck Embry. 
  Ken Hillberg builds and restores classic sprint cars and midgets. Ron Henderson built the “Lady Dragon,” a self designed, classic boat-tailed Speedster. JD Tone, Neil Thompson, and Keith Allen are also dry lakes Hall of Famers, and regulars to the garage. JD makes the dash board plaques for those racing in the SCTA. Yoder, who goes only by one name, is one of the best painters, pinstripers, glass workers and designers in the country. Indian “Red” (Bob) Nichols, Stewart Van Dyne, Jay Cotting, Bob Webb, and Max Kranz are also members of the Gear Grinders SCTA car club. Ed Beck flew P51’s in WWII. Also on hand at the garage are; Jim Loving, Don Stevens, Terry Haines, John Drake, Larry McKinney, Matt Treis, Kevin and Don Stegen, Norman Grant, “Big John” Hunt, Kent Cowgur, Patrick Tone, and Gary Rycraft. No one is as outrageous as the Reverend Scrub Hansen, or Bob Martin, who regales people with his stories of J.J. Junkin. The group that shows up each day is different, but the knowledge they possess is beyond measure. Jack’s Garage is a magical place. A car culture setting that transports us back in time, surrounded by the men who lived during the golden age of hot rodding.
Gone Racin’ is at Rnparks1@juno.com 

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STAFF NOTES: the following came from www.hotrodhotline.com.

     MSRA's (Minnesota Street Racers Association) "Back to the Fifties" event will celebrate 40 years of hot rods and community this summer in St. Paul, MN.  In tribute to the event, we will be reposting excerpts from a series of articles that appeared in the MSRA LineChaser magazine in 2012 documenting the history of the event.  Thanks to Bud Bloomquist for compiling the articles in the first place, to Gary Magner for facilitating them, to all the contributors and to Graphics Design Inc. for providing us files in the proper format.  These excerpts were originally published in the in Feb. 2012 issue of LineChaser.
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     Prior to the first Back to the 50’s, the club was working on being the host club for the 1974 Street Rod Nationals.  Much work was being done to get ready to be the host and as an MSRA group we needed some experience to be able to host the Nats.  It was all new to us.
     Gene Sonnen and his girlfriend, Red, get the credit for coming up with this idea.  Gene wanted to show Red how cruising was way back in the ‘50s.  It was brought up at the membership meeting and we decided to give it a whirl.  It would be a tune-up for the Nats and a time to have some fun.  The date was set and it was Friday night June 21, 1974.
     The first Back to the 50’s was held at Midway Shopping Center.  One hundred fifty cars showed up.  Jerry Johnson directed cars out of the parking lot in small groups to control traffic on University Avenue.  The group cruised to the Grandview Theater to see the showing of “American Graffiti.”  From there we cruised to Porky’s on University Avenue.  Then we were free to cruise all we wanted.  It was a great night of fun!  The event was sponsored by Midway Commerce and Civic Association and MSRA.  From Collaborators: Bud Bloomquist #54, Rick Schnell #251, Fred Romo #246, Mike Mason #L-8, and Jim Jones #151
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     By now it’s history.  MSRA’s Back to the 50’s Night” was probably the best event that has happened to the Association since it was formed back in ’67. Designed as a pre-promotion for the NSRA Street Rod Nationals, the “50’s Night” provided those who participated a look into the past with some members dressing in the styles and traditions of those fabulous ‘50s.  More than 2,500 Nats handbills were passed out to the thousands of people who viewed the cars on display in the Midway Shopping Center parking lot.  More than 250 cars were counted during the one-hour parking lot show.
     After the parking lot display, the cars were let loose on University Avenue to “cruise” just like the old days.  The rods left the parking lot at intervals with two or three cars in a group.  They overwhelmed the “Avenue” from every direction as people sat in lawn chairs on the curbs to watch the parade go by.  Many young people were seen on the center island of University watching the rods go by at even a closer vantage point.  One old “drunk” on the corner of University and Snelling was seen to dance the “Lindy” every time a street rod would pass.  Many of the rods made the traditional pass through Porky’s Drive In on the first leg of the cruise.  After about an hour of cruising, the rods returned to the parking lot for a regrouping and a side trip over to the local Grandview Theater where “American Graffiti” was about to let out.
     Four different groups set out to the Grandview.  Each group was taken to a different location so that the theater would be “blitzed” from every direction when the film let out.  The theater is on the corner of Grand and Fairview in St Paul.  When the film let out a 9:27pm, Grand Avenue was “alive” with street rods.  The sidewalk in front of the theater had MSRA members handing out handbills to the totally unsuspecting theater patrons who walked out of the theater after viewing the film version of what was happening “live” in front of the theater.  The reaction of the movie goers was unreal.  The sight of low-rider ’50 Merc “Bailon” custom, many ’32 and ’34 Fords, ’40 Ford converts, ’57 Chevys, T Roadsters, rods and customs from the past and the people dressed in ‘50s styles literally “blew their minds”.
     One young fellow and his girlfriend just stood on the sidewalk with their mouths open, staring.  One guy said, “Look at the ‘Pharaohs’ Merc’”, pointing to Sterling Ashby’s custom of the ‘50s.  (The car was built by Bailon Custom’s in Northern California in 1956 for Sonny Morris.)  Just about the time everything was getting back to normal, a wine colored ’40 Ford “Woodie” driven by some “red-headed gal” slowly cruised up, waited for the semaphore on the corner to turn green and floored it and exposed a “mooner” in the rear window.  After the crowed regained its composure and stopped laughing, they continued to watch the rods cruise by for the next half-hour.
     After the Grandview Blitz, most of the rods returned to University Avenue and either cruised or pulled into Porky’s for Coke and onion rings or a “Twinburger” or went back to the parking lot to reminisce, or went to “The Esquire Bar” for free beer or went to Minneapolis’ Lake Street to give them a little taste of the evening. The success of the evening prompted many members to ask that we do it again this late summer or early fall, which will allow those who couldn’t make the first one to get in on some of the fun.  We’ll see … and let you know later.  By Jerry Johnson #L-1 - This article was take from the July 1974 LineChaser, and used in the 2012 look back.
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     The week before our first Back to the 50’s I was working in LA but the timing could not have been better.  I had ordered my Tru Spoke chrome wheels a month earlier for my ‘34 Ford.  I drove far south of LAX Thursday to pick up the wheels, went back to the motel and tied two boxes into one so I could check my 4 wheels as luggage on Western Airlines at no cost.  My laundry was jammed into the boxes of wheels so they did not move.
     There was no limit to how many bags to check in free in those days and they did not care whether it was a suitcase or boxes of wheels.  To this day I am not sure how I pulled that one off.  Late Thursday, I arrived home and first thing Friday I was at the tire dealer so I could arrive at Midway Shopping Center with what I think was the first set of chrome Tru Spoke wire wheels to show up in Minnesota.  By Gary Magner #193

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STAFF NOTES; the following newsletter comes from Gale Banks and if anyone would like to get on his mailing list go to gbanks@bankspower.com and request that they add your email address to their list.  Gale is a well-known LSR guy.   Unfortunately the newsletter was not sent to me in time to get the news out about Gale's interview with the LA Times.
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     Gale Bank's Insider News and Deals. Live interview today @ 3pm PST.  LA Times interviewing Gale Banks live today at 3pm.  Gale plans to talk about his upcoming cutting edge projects, including his work with the military and how all that relates to you and your vehicle. If you miss it we will upload a copy of the podcast when we have it.  (
Click Here)
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     Revving up the Army's Humvee, by the Los Angeles Times - April 2013.  For more than 50 years, Gale Banks has tweaked fast cars and trucks to make them even faster.  Banks has become a legend among the aftermarket speed crowd, having set land-speed records and built what was once the world’s fastest passenger car.  Perhaps that’s why it might seem odd that the California speed merchant - founder and president of Gale Banks Engineering of Azusa - is vying for contracts to improve the performance of a vehicle that is about as quick and nimble as a rolling bank vault.  The U.S. Army’s HMMWV, more commonly known as the Humvee, is such a heavyweight that you will hear - and feel - one approaching well before you see it. And that can be a problem for the soldiers it is designed to transport and protect.  "To escape, to evade, to get into action, you don’t want to come slowly," said Banks, whose son is a former Army medic who served in Iraq. "The quicker you get there, the safer you will be." 
   There are more California companies in the $30-billion aftermarket automotive industry than in any other state. These are companies that make products that improve the speed, quickness, handling and braking of performance cars and trucks.  But that isn't all that they do. Businesses and even the U.S. military will frequently call upon these companies to help solve some major problems with their car and truck fleets. Some are looking to improve fuel efficiency. Others need help in reducing emissions. Increasing durability and dependability is sometimes the goal.  That happens more often than some people might think, said Peter MacGillivray, vice president for events and communications for the more than 6,500 member companies of the Specialty Equipment Market Assn.  "It's not unusual for SEMA companies to partner with other businesses to help fulfill a specific need or address a particular problem," MacGillivray. "That's actually their sweet spot." 
   The Humvee is one example.  It's a vehicle that often weighed between 7,500 and 10,500 pounds before all of the "uparmoring," as the military refers to it, needed to meet new challenges in Afghanistan and Iraq.  With much heavier armor, heavier weaponry, additional electronics and more, a Humvee can weigh upward of 7 tons. One weighed more than 17,000 pounds, Banks said.  "It was as if they had taken a Humvee and parked it on top of another one," he said.  But the vehicles still have the same 190-horsepower engine as original equipment, an engine that Banks described as "underwhelming at best," even before thousands of pounds were added to the bulk it had to transport. 
   Banks, now 70 and showing no interest in slowing down, has a lot of expertise to bring.  His father walked a beat as a Los Angeles Police Department officer, but had come home from World War II suffused with knowledge of how to keep just about any kind of ground vehicle in good repair. It was know-how, and a way to approach business, that he quickly passed on to his son.  "He'd say, 'Lie to someone about what something does and he'll be angry enough to tell 100 people. Tell him the truth and he'll only be happy enough to tell 10 people, but those are 10 who might become customers,'" Banks said.  His customers include big automakers and individual motorists who say that Banks' products have made their long drives easier and more economical. 
   To help with the problems of the Humvee's engine stalling in the high elevations of Afghanistan's formidable mountains, Banks said he has been able to use the experience gained from working on cars and trucks with engines designed to meet the challenges of the nation's second-oldest race, the Pikes Peak International Hill Climb in Colorado.  That's a 12.42-mile, 156-turn race uphill that ends at the peak's 14,110-foot summit. (Click here to read more about Gale's adventures at Pikes Peak.)  Banks said it isn't necessary to replace the Humvee engine, but bringing modern technology to it is vital.  For "significantly increased power, high-altitude capability and improved fuel efficiency," one of the solutions Banks has come up with uses his Sidewinder turbocharger system.
   The Sidewinder turbo adds 65 horsepower, Banks said.  He also replaced the engine's intake manifold, which is the part that carries air to the engine's cylinders. Banks also added a better exhaust system and improved the braking performance.  "We cut the zero to 60 miles per hour performance in half," Banks said of the performance changes. "We doubled the uphill climb speed."  "It's always about the challenge. What's next has always been what has interested me," he said. "But that is the Southern California gearhead mentality for you."
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Want to learn more about the Banks products available for your specific vehicle?  Sign up for our free test report. Gale Banks Engineering, 546 S. Duggan Avenue, Azusa, CA 91702. 800-GET-POWER.   

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Event posters celebrate Aston Martin and Porsche 911, By Kandace Hawkinson. PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. (April 16, 2013) -- 
   When Edsel B. Ford II came upon the 1956 Lincoln Continental MK II last year, he admired the long lines and elegant custom styling of the automobile, but he didn't immediately recognize it. Imagine his surprise when he learned the car had, in fact, belonged to his mother, Anne, as evidenced by the original owner's manual inscribed with her name. Edsel was just 8 years old when his father, Henry Ford II, ordered the car for his wife, who drove the luxury vehicle for about two years before selling it to her personal assistant for use as a daily driver.  
   The car, now impeccably restored, will be among the many pre- and postwar custom-bodied Lincolns featured at the 63rd Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance on August 18 at Pebble Beach Resorts. It also stars on this year's commemorative Pebble Beach Concours poster, printed from an original painting created by Ken Eberts, founder and president of the Automotive Fine Arts Society. Also depicted on the Concours poster is the 1939 Lincoln Zephyr created for Edsel's grandfather, Edsel Bryant Ford, who served as president of Ford Motor Company from 1919 through 1943, bringing both style and finesse to the Lincoln marque.  
   The 1956 Lincoln currently belongs to Rick Schmidt, whose father Jim discovered the dilapidated vehicle in a classified advertisement. Had they not already owned a 1956 metallic mint green MK II that had belonged to Benson Ford, and a 1956 sapphire blue metallic MK II that had belonged to William Clay Ford Sr (both brothers of Henry Ford II) the Schmidt’s would not have taken on the project. "It seemed only right to have the trio of 1956 MK IIs originally owned by the Ford brothers," says Rick, "so we bought the car and dove into the project, taking on our biggest restoration challenge yet. It is now a stunning car, and we're thrilled to bring it to Pebble Beach."     
   Purchased through Ford's central office, with the names of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ford II on the original factory production order, the car cost $10,000, the price of a house in 1956. The only MK II ordered with a Hartz cloth roof, the interior of the car is upholstered in elegant gray wool broadcloth with red piping and contrasting black leather on the door panels and dash. The car also is unique in that it was finished without a hood ornament at Anne's request.   "My mother was a very sophisticated woman and her MK II definitely mirrored her personality," says Edsel. "I am pleased to announce the Edsel & Eleanor Ford House is bringing a never-seen-before special Lincoln to the Pebble Beach Concours for display. I look forward to that--and to seeing my mother's car again. It is a beautiful Continental, and I am honored Rick Schmidt is bringing it out."  
   Portraying the Continental on canvas has been a wonderful trip through time, says Eberts: "In 1955, at 12 years of age, when the 1956 Continental MK II debuted, I was excited. In 1965, as a designer in the Lincoln Studio, I was inspired by the MK II. And today, in creating the poster art for the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance, I am proud to be portraying this car's classically simple, subtly sculptured, impeccable design. With just the right amount of jewelry in the form of chrome, it was a statement of exquisite taste and elegance."  
   Eberts' final poster artwork will be featured at the Automotive Fine Arts Society exhibit at Pebble Beach that is sponsored by the Lincoln Motor Company and held in tandem with the 63rd Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance on Sunday, August 18.   The 2013 Pebble Beach Tour d'Elegance poster, with artwork by another AFAS artist, Barry Rowe, will celebrate the centennial of Aston Martin. The 2013 Pebble Beach RetroAuto poster, with art by Tim Layzell, will focus on the Porsche 911. The Pebble Beach Tour d'Elegance presented by Rolex takes place on Thursday, August 15, and RetroAuto opens Friday, August 16, and continues through Concours Sunday.  Information on all of the events of Pebble Beach Automotive Week and tickets for the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance are available at www.pebblebeachconcours.net.

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Barringer pictures from Spencer.

Click For Scan 2
Bill Barringer Holding His Newly Restored Photo of his father George Barringer with Harry Miller and crew in 1939 at Bonneville . Spencer Simon Collection 4/9/13.

 Click For Scan 4 - AAA Awards of George Barringer in 1940 Signed by our President of SLHRN' s Grandfather Eddie Miller ( Jim Miller's Grandfather ) sent by Bill Barringer 4/9/13. Spencer Simon Collection ===+++=== Scan Tiff - Gulf Miller Indy car sits Behind Craig Breedlove's " Spirit of America " Nov/15/1965 at Indianapolis motor speedway museum . Sent by Bill Barringer 4/9/13 . SpencerSimon Collection

 Click For Scan 7 - A letter came with the picture. { Hello Spencer, You may not be old enough to remember Charlie McCarthy , but here is a picture of Charlie and I . Harry Miller gave me Charlie for Christmas when I was 2 years old At 73 years ago . Mr Miller was always very nice to me . I got old and he stayed the same . - Bill. } From Bill Barringer 4/9/13 . Spencer Simon collection

Click For Scan 8 - Bill Barringer racing the George Barringer Special. Bill recreated the famous #26 car after his father's car #. Sent in by Bill Barringer 4/9/13. Sent by Bill Barringer 4/9/13 . Spencer Simon Collection

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Dear Mr. Parks, I'm Stu Hanssen and my Dad raced this car--the 3rd and last Baldwin Special. I thought it may have had a connection to the Troutman Barnes car that Chuck Daigh drove in the 50's as well. Does anyone know that there may have been a prototype to that car? I am in process of bringing our car back to Cailf. back to our family. I loved your article about the service for Chuck and what a hero he was!!!!  Many thanks, Stu Hanssen Santa Ynes Ca. 805-688-4773

Dad%20at%20Santra%20Barbara  Scan21

line12

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Land Speed Racing Websites:
www.hotrodhotline.com, www.landspeedracing.com

 [Email Land Speed Racing]

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Members:

Jonathan Amo, Brett Arena, Henry Astor, Gale Banks, Glen Barrett, Mike Bastian, Lee Blaisdell, Jim Bremner, Warren Bullis, Burly Burlile, George Callaway, Gary Carmichael, John Backus, John Chambard, Jerry Cornelison, G. Thatcher Darwin, Jack Dolan, Ugo Fadini, Bob Falcon, Rich Fox, Glenn Freudenberger, Don Garlits, Bruce Geisler, Stan Goldstein, Andy Granatelli, Walt James, Wendy Jeffries, Ken Kelley, Mike Kelly, Bret Kepner, Kay Kimes, Jim Lattin, Mary Ann and Jack Lawford, Fred Lobello, Eric Loe, Dick Martin, Ron Martinez, Tom McIntyre, Don McMeekin, Bob McMillian, Tom Medley, Jim Miller, Don Montgomery, Bob Morton, Mark Morton, Paula Murphy, Landspeed Louise Ann Noeth, Frank Oddo, David Parks, Richard Parks, Wally Parks (in memoriam), Eric Rickman, Willard Ritchie, Roger Rohrdanz, Evelyn Roth, Ed Safarik, Frank Salzberg, Dave Seely, Charles Shaffer, Mike Stanton, David Steele, Doug Stokes, Bob Storck, Zach Suhr, Maggie Summers, Gary Svoboda, Pat Swanson, Al Teague, JD Tone, Jim Travis, Randy Travis, Jack Underwood and Tina Van Curen, Richard Venza.
 

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