Header__ARTICLEShorter
line12
slsrh-logo1

SOCIETY OF LAND SPEED RACING HISTORIANS
NEWSLETTER 282 - May 22, 2013
Editor: Richard Parks, Rnparks1@Juno.com 
President of the Society: Jim Miller, 1-818-846-5139.
Photographic Editor of the Society
: Roger Rohrdanz, beachtruck@juno.com
Northern California Reporter: Spencer Simon, sparklecraftspecial@yahoo.com
Field Reporter/Historian: Bob Falcon, RFalcon500@aol.com

Click On All Images / Link For more Info / Images

Some Names To Look For In This Newsletter:
President's Corner: A reader wrote in to ask a question about Rex Burnett and what he was known for; "Issue #281 spends about 2000 words on, 'For insurance purpose, what are our Rex Burnett’s' worth?'; Staff Editorial by Richard Parks: Recently I received the following letter from a member; Our dad, Arnold Baer Shuman, passed away on Friday, May 10, 2013; Dean Jeffries passed away on May 5, 2013 at the age of 80; I'm trying to identify an old streamliner in a photograph; STAFF NOTES: Ron Main sent in the following notice; I am a BNI member, have been participating at Bonneville for years, and am now looking for some historic information; The Great Race teams will be on hand at their location in the race track behind the Grandstand on Friday at MSRA’s “Back to the 50′s Weekend” event; Cruisin For A Cure makes is the nation’s largest one day car show; Somernites Cruise welcomes back "Big Daddy" Don Garlits to the May show; The inaugural New England Hot Rod Reunion presented by AAA Insurance will be at New England Dragway, September 12-14, 2013 in Epping, New Hampshire; From the Save the Salt website, written by the late Mike Waters; STAFF NOTES: It seems that I publish this old article of mine on a constant basis whenever a racetrack is in peril; OLD 66. By Le Roi Tex Smith; The Norm Rapp Story, Part 2.  By Spencer Simon, SLSRH Northern California reporter; Evelyn Roth sent in this link that shows all the Indy 500 pace cars from 1911 to the present; Goodguys announces a special new Texas Road Tour this fall that will take hot rodders from Goodguys World Headquarters in Pleasanton, California to the 21st Lone Star Nationals at Texas Motor Speedway

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

President's Corner    
   A reader wrote in to ask a question about Rex Burnett and what he was known for; "Issue #281 spends about 2000 words on, 'For insurance purpose, what are our Rex Burnett’s' worth?'  What are Rex Burnett's? Maybe you should let the readers of newsletter know what is a Rex Burnett?"
     Rex Burnett, the artist, produced quality artwork and cutaway drawings showing the inner workings of an automobile.  The following comes from www.rexburnett.net.
     "As a youngster, Rex Burnett liked to examine the tire tracks left in the dusty road by an occasional automobile passing through his native Boston, Arkansas.  He started drawing very early, filling the open spaces of his school books with car sketches.  As a teenager he studied the automotive ads in THE SATURDAY EVENING POST® and COLLIERS® magazines.  The pastel renderings of futuristic cars in ESQUIREE® magazine by designer Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky intrigued Rex; yet it was the startling beauty of the innovative 1936 Cord 810 that elevated its legendary designer, Gordon M. Buehrig, to near sainthood in Burnett's mind.  Burnett's college study in engineering - with a minor in art - was interrupted by service in the Navy during World War II; his formal art education was limited to a still-life drawing class.      
  After the war, Burnett worked as a technical artist for Douglas Aircraft where he created complex illustrations for aircraft catalogs, manuals, and proposals.  Fellow artist George Stevens took note of Burnett's automotive sketches and introduced him to Gary Davis, future creator of the Davis Divan, a three-wheeled car.  Davis needed someone to conceive and draw a body style for his Davis car, so he hired Burnett to do the job.  Burnett's phantom drawing of the Davis Divan was published September 1948 in HOT ROD magazine.  After that, he made regular contributions to the magazine illustrating the 'Hot Rod of the Month,' while still working full-time in the aerospace industry.  He later created art for MOTOR TREND, AUTO, and CYCLE magazines.      
  The source material for Burnett's automotive drawings were usually a small stack of black and white photographs of a car's components shot separately in pieces, in a garage or work space, prior to the car's assembly. Following the principles of three-point perspective, Burnett used these photographs as reference material to 'assemble' the car together as a pencil drawing on tracing paper. Over his pencil drawing he laid down a sheet of vellum upon which he used a technical pen to make the final ink drawing."

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Staff Editorial: by Richard Parks.
     Recently I received the following letter from a member.  "I want to know what I need to do to protect my photographs from thieves.  I didn't see any photographs that I sent in to the SLSRH concerning the recent article that I submitted.  Any reason?  I am concerned about what you wrote in stating that a source for the photographs will approve the submission of a few of the photographs as I have not received a response from that person yet.  How do I handle this?" 
   In issue 281 I gave Jim Miller’s excellent researched answer and you will notice that it differs from mine. Legally, Jim’s answer is the better one. Morally and ethically my answer is better. When borrowing someone else’s work the burden is always on the borrower. Otherwise, although you might not be sued or arrested, you are still taking (pilfering) someone else’s work and that isn’t ethical.
     Roger Rohrdanz, our Photographic Editor, replies as follows; "As far as protecting your pictures from thieves on the internet there isn't much you can do, except put your name on the photograph, and make the image as small as possible.  Check your computer for something called SAVE FOR WEB.” 
     On many occasions we have discussed and editorialized about ownership rights.  It is a major issue and one that is interpreted differently and then re-interpreted again and again as people argue and fight over what ownership means.  Let's divide the issue into two parts; those who ask to borrow or use your photographs and those who simply take them as their own.  Notice I avoided the words theft and steal. 
     For those who take your photographs without permission you have a simple choice; ignore them and let them use your photographs or take them to court and get an order forcing them to relinquish what they took without permission.  Since it is expensive to go to court and the value of the photographs and visual objects are low, you probably will not recoup court costs.  I am sad to inform you, but there are many unscrupulous people who take and use what does not belong to them.  You can send them a warning or call them on the phone to make demands, but you cannot make threats.  You are only allowed to make demands.  A demand is lawful, but a threat is unlawful and will get you into a lot of legal and criminal trouble.  A demand is like this; "You have taken my photograph and made money off of it and I want you to return my property and agree to damages, such as a royalty of what you collected off of my work."  That is a legal and correct way to make a demand.  A threat is illegal, such as; "If you don't give it back I will sue," or "If you don't give it back I'll knock your block off."  Those are threats, because if you have no intention of going to court and you say you will, then that's a threat and not a demand. Threatening violence is always deemed a threat and not a demand.
     Now it becomes more complicated if you are dealing with a situation where the person had no intention of taking your property, but ends up with it.  That person could say that he got the photo from a friend, or a magazine, or off the internet, or from someone who "owned" it and gave it to him.  He could say that he borrowed the photograph from someone who died and thus he "inherited" it, or it is in his possession and "possession is nine/tenths of the law."  He could also say that the photo belongs in the "public domain," or that the "copyright or patent" has expired.  He could say that the photo was passed around and therefore owned by many people.  He could say that the picture or photo is owned "by all of us now."  You can see that all these arguments are headed for a judge to answer.
     The answer to ALL OF THESE statements is the same; the photograph or picture is owned by the person who took the photo, with a few exceptions.  Even if you asked your buddy to take a picture of you and Mr Famous Race Car Driver, the photographs belong to the instigator of the action, the owner of the camera and the film (or digital electronic card).  If the owner lends the film, gives the film, loses the film, or in any way or shape does not have "possession" then ownership still stays with the original photographer.  If the owner dies, ownership passes to his estate and if he doesn't have an estate the ownership passes to the STATE that the person resided in, until such time as the state declares in favor of someone else.  If there is ANY family, the ownership goes to them in order of closeness, UNLESS there is a will that defines who owns the photographs. There are always exceptions and one of those is based on statute of limitations, or copyright expiration dates. Another exception is if the photographer is taking the photos for someone else who is paying him to do so. But not for a freelancing photographer, who owns the photos regardless if someone pays him to do a job. There are always complications and exceptions to any rule of law.
     BUT, BUT, BUT says the person who has CONTROL of the photo, "I have it in my possession and Mr Loose and Forgetful with the Photographs said I could have it."  WRONG.  Ownership stays with the estate, unless you can provide a CONTRACT specifying that the previous owner sold or gave it as a gift to the NEW OWNER.  No contract means that there is no ownership.  There is an exception; if the previous owner gave his ownership of the photograph or object by an ORAL approval.  But to be effective that ORAL contract has to be witnessed by an impartial third party and BELIEVABLE by the interested parties or by the courts.  Otherwise a thief could say, "Those furs and jewels, officer, oh, the lady in that house gave them to me."  That is an oral argument that is unbelievable and he is going off to jail. 
     Unfortunately, most photographs are just not that valuable or worth the time to demand your rights or for the courts and legal profession to challenge.  And a great part of the problem is the SLOPPINESS of the owner in establishing his rights.  The owner needs to keep an inventory of his photographs, write on the back of the photo (on an attached acid free label) the name of the owner, date, place, etc.  The owner should also keep his photos secure.  If he lends the photos he should have the borrower sign a contract specifying the use, fees and when it is to be returned.  The owner needs to follow up and request the return if the borrower defaults on his word.  Do car guys do these things?  Probably only one in a MILLION ever does it the legal way with a contract.  The bottom line is this; it is up to the owner to take precautions.  If the owner doesn't, then although you still OWN the object, you won't POSSESS the object. 
   Now some photos are so old and they have not been protected by copyrights or the legal protection of the law and there is no estate; such photos are deemed to be “in the public domain.” When that happens you can use the photos in any way that you want, but unless you copyright the photo, do not claim it as your own. Credit it to the original photographer and say, “Photograph is in the Public Domain.” That protects you from charges of theft and plagiarism. Some people will say this; “Ah, the heck with it, I will just go and use it and they can sue me.” The SLSRH does not agree or support such a negative attitude, but we understand that in some cases it is impossible to find the owner and in all likelihood using the photo without permission is the only option. But, if the owner does show up on the scene, then a reputable person is willing to then ask and get permission or retract the photograph. Most of the time the owner of a photograph simply wants CREDIT for taking and owning the photo and it is only right that we honor his request.
   In regards to photographs not showing up in the SLSRH, please contact Roger Rohrdanz, who is our photographic editor. He will coordinate efforts to see that captions and photographs go with the correct article submitted. As to getting prior permission, send the owner another email and ask again if you can have permission to use the photograph. If the owner says no, or if the owner later retracts his/her permission, then we shouldn’t proceed and publish the photograph. After all, it doesn’t belong to us.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Our dad, Arnold Baer Shuman, passed away on Friday, May 10, 2013.  There will be a memorial service for him on Friday, May 31, 2013 at 2pm.  The service will be held at Louis Suburban Chapel 13-01 Broadway, Fair Lawn, NJ 07410.  If you would like to attend please rsvp back to this email address to let us know we can expect you.  In lieu of flowers donations can be made to Doctors Without Borders, in memory of Arnold Baer Shuman.  https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/donate/tribute.cfm.  Arnold's sons, Scott and David, will be monitoring this email account and will be happy to respond to any questions or requests you may have.  Thank you, The Shuman Family (Lois Shuman, David Shuman and Scott Shuman)
                       ------------------------------
A. B. Shuman passes.  Written by Leo Levine on 5/13/2013, for AUTOWEEK magazine.
     Arnold Baer Shuman, better known as “A.B.,” the former Naval Aviator and hot-rodder who was generally considered to be the auto industry's best product public-relations man, died suddenly Friday at his home in Hillsdale, New Jersey. He was 72. The cause of death was not announced.  Shuman was the leading product spokesman for Mercedes-Benz of North America from the time he joined the company in 1972 until he took early retirement in 1995. A native of Sharon, Massachusetts, Shuman graduated from Tufts University in 1962 and spent the next five years in the Navy, with the majority of his service time spent as the pilot of a submarine-hunting P2V Neptune patrol aircraft. He flew in the Caribbean and Mediterranean theaters and also in the North Atlantic, flying eight- and 10-hour sorties between Iceland and the waters off the Russian port of Murmansk, skimming the ocean at several hundred feet and returning with his windshield covered with salt.
     Shuman joined the Petersen Publishing Company in Los Angeles in 1967 and worked in various editorial capacities at CAR CRAFT, MOTOR TREND and HOT ROD until coming to Mercedes in 1972.  As a teenager Shuman was an early adherent of the 1950's hot-rod movement in New England, which he described in COOL CARS AND SQUARE ROLLBARS, a book he and his brother wrote and A.B. self-published in his retirement. He was also part owner and crew chief of a Chevrolet-engined streamliner which ran at the Bonneville Salt Flats, topping 300 miles per hour last fall.  Shuman is survived by his wife, Lois; sons David and Scott; a sister, Nancy Black of Boynton Beach, Florida, and a brother, Bernard, of Foxboro, Massachusetts.  Funeral arrangements were private. A memorial service has been scheduled for May 31.  The location will be announced at a later date.
                       ------------------------------
   Hot Rod Legend A.B. Shuman dies at 72. The hot rod and automotive world has lost one of the great hot rod legends, Arnold Baer Shuman, better known as “A.B.,” who died suddenly Friday, May 10, 2013 at his home in Hillsdale, New Jersey. He was 72. A.B. was a former Mercedes-Benz spokesman during the 1970’s and 1980’s. He was also a great historian and author. He influenced many in our industry.  Hotrodding was his biggest passion. He was a good friend to www.Hotrodhotline.com and in the past had taken pictures for our magazine.  Our thoughts and prayers go out to his family at this time.  A.B. is survived by his wife, Lois, and his sons David and Scott. 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dean Jeffries passed away on May 5, 2013 at the age of 80. Jeffries was known for his distinctive styling, paint, body work and vision. He fabricated vehicles for Hollywood, and put his original touches on them for racers, teams and individual enthusiasts. Jeffries was a pin-striper, stuntman, customizer, and consultant for Hollywood, for the Indy 500, and for those friends and fans who came to his shop. See tributes posted at DeanJeffries.com. Dean, also known as “Deano” began pinstriping cars with the legendary Von Dutch in Lynwood, California, in the early 1950's. His first major success was in the 1964 Grand National Roadster Show with his asymmetrically styled MANTARAY, which featured a Maserati Grand Prix chassis and a Cobra engine. Other cars from the his creative hand include the MONKEEMOBILE, the original Green Hornet’s BLACK BEAUTY, James Bonds’ MOON BUGGY from Diamonds Are Forever, and the 35 foot long 12 wheel LANDMASTER built for the movie Damnation Alley. He was also enamored with the Indianapolis 500, where he crewed for many years for the legendary AJ Foyt. Jeffries also painted many of the Indy 500 entries, and one year he painted 22 of the 33 starters in the field. In his semi-retired years, he could occasionally be found as a special guest at car shows across the country, but his passion was to be at his shop five days a week restoring his personal car collection and meeting with old friends.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I'm trying to identify an old streamliner in a photograph. The car is #999c, (see attached photo).  Randy Chenowth, saltfever@cox.net
   RANDY: The car belonged to Bob Herda from Redwood City, California who entered this wild looking streamliner for the first time at Bonneville in 1956 after taking six years to build it. Herda’s streamliner was named Attempt I. That first year Bob spent most of the week making changes requested by the tech inspectors. On Saturday, September 1, 1956 the car made its first shakedown pass at 149.62 mph. The still unfinished Class C Streamliner was powered by a 300 cubic inch Supercharged Chrysler motor built by Doug Hartelt and presided over by Fred Carrillo. With the new extended nose and re-worked tailfin, the car ran 237.78 mph for a second in class behind the Shadof Special at 252.63 mph. The picture that you sent shows the car at Bonneville in 1959. Jim Miller

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

STAFF NOTES: Ron Main sent in the following notice.
   Need Salt Miners. The 100th ANNIVERSARY OF BONNEVILLE. Sponsors include; Bruce Meyer, Dennis Varni, Lee Siclio, STAGS Car Club, World’s fastest Sprint Car. Just an update on how the Century of speed program is going. It’s a lot harder than I ever thought to raise the money, but I am half way there. I had originally thought that I would get a lot more support and help from the Land Speed community. I have met with a lot more resistance than I had anticipated, but with your help, we will get the sponsors we need. I am thankful for Bob Johnson and Dan Warner for all their help and support. 
   Barrett Jackson has not only stepped up to be on the board of directors, but is also buying 300 books to give out to their VIP’s and bidders at their world famous Scottsdale Auction. One disappointment was on my entry level (Salt Miners) sponsorship. I have only got one to work in our Salt Mine; I guess I will have to get them from Home Depot. I know that you are busy and don’t need any new projects, but we need your help. Please send out our website. With your help at getting the word out, we will get the sponsors. www.bonnevillecenturyofspeed.com. Tell all your friends to help us find at least one more Salt miner to pick up a shovel to help with our cause. For more information contact Ron Main at (818) 998-7848, or Cell (818) 523-7005. Bonneville Century of Speed, 1197 Los Angeles Avenue, SUITE C142, Simi Valley, California. 93065  Email: rmain@canogarebar.com, or websites at www.speeddemon.us, and www.bonnevillecenturyofspeed.com. Thanks, Ron Main

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I am a BNI member, have been participating at Bonneville for years, and am now looking for some historic information. I would like to find out if Tom Rutherford ran a Devin SS car at Bonneville around 1959 or 1960, picture of car below. Also below, a picture of my land speed motorcycle, 253 mph 2012 and looking for 300 mph. Jerry Klawitter, Jerry.Klawitter@integralife.com.
   JERRY: Here are some leads. Check with Jim Miller, our Society's researcher and historian for information on who raced at Bonneville. If he doesn't know he can give you some references. Secondly, check with Art Evans who formed the Fabulous Fifties group that keeps alive the sports car and road racing Era of the 1940's and '50's. Send us more photos and history on the car and bike and I'll post it for our members to see and maybe someone will know the answers to your questions. Anything concerning motorcycles can also be sent to Anita at anita@hotrodhotline.com. She will post it to www.Bikerhotline.com where motorcycle fans can learn more about what you are doing. It's a great little motorcycle website that even the car guys enjoy reading. Another source of information is Greg Sharp at the Wally Parks NHRA Motorsports Museum in Pomona, California. The phone number there is 909-622-2133, or email Greg at GSharp@nhra.com

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Great Race teams will be on hand at their location in the race track behind the Grandstand on Friday at MSRA’s “Back to the 50′s Weekend” event. They will attend Rally School in the morning and during the late morning they will depart for a short practice session on the roads of Minnesota, leaving through gate 15. They will return after noon and will be on hand for the remainder of the day with their race cars on display to meet and greet attendees of MSRA’s “Back to the 50′s Weekend” event. Saturday morning they will complete their final preparations for the Great Race’s Grand Start at 50′s. The starting line-up, beginning at 10:30 am, will take competitors from the racetrack on a route through the event, leading them to the Minnesota State Fairgrounds Main Gate at Snelling and Dan Patch Avenues where the Grand Start ceremonies will take place at 11 am. Follow the Great Race as participants make their way along the Mighty Mississippi on their way to the Grand Finale at the Gulf in Mobile, Alabama on Sunday June 30. For details about the Great Race go to www.greatrace.com

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Cruisin For A Cure makes is the nation’s largest one day car show. The show will be in September at the Orange County Fairgrounds, where over 4000 vehicles will be on display. Free PSA Prostate Cancer screening tests will be available for men over 40. Proceeds from the show benefit the City Of Hope cancer center. 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Somernites Cruise welcomes back "Big Daddy" Don Garlits to the May show. "Big Daddy" is again bringing his Swamp Rat dragster and will be joined by members of the Straight Axel Mafia and the Kentucky Motorsports Hall of Fame. We will be doing another Cackle-Fest at this show.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The inaugural New England Hot Rod Reunion presented by AAA Insurance will be at New England Dragway, September 12-14, 2013 in Epping, New Hampshire. See https://tix.extremetix.com/Online/?siteID=3666&cartID=2cc035b8-de9b-427f-a3fa-052cf153e160. New England area fans will now have a nostalgia drag racing and hot rodding event all their own. As part of the celebration, the NHRA Museum is offering free admission for children 15 and younger with the purchase an adult ticket. Admission includes a bag filled with an official event program, dash plaque and collectible hard card. AAA members can save on admission.
   Produced and benefiting the Wally Parks NHRA Motorsports Museum, the family-friendly Reunion is a three day festival of speed, hot rods and American automotive enthusiasm. Race fans will enjoy rubbing elbows with many heroes of drag racing’s past and enjoy watching the heart-pounding nostalgia drag racing action on the track throughout the event. The fun kicks off on Thursday with thrilling Hot Heads nostalgia racing on the track and hot rods, customs and collectible cars in the Show ’N Shine area. More racing and a special Grand Marshal and Honoree Reception highlight Friday’s festivities.  Saturday night’s grand-finale Cacklefest show will have dozens of nitro-burning, historic, front-engine dragsters and other classic race cars will be push-started and fired up on the dragstrip just like in the 1950's and '60's. The roar of the engines and flame-throwing headers creates an amazing symphony of “cackling” sights and sounds that only old iron motors can produce on nitro.
   Legendary New England drag racer Jimmy King of Rhode Island is the Grand Marshal of the inaugural event. King and the late Don Marshall comprised one of the best NHRA Top Fuel drag racing teams in the East Coast during the 1960's and '70's. To purchase tickets for the inaugural New England Hot Rod Reunion, please visit www.NHRAtix.com or call (800) 884-NHRA (6472). Racing, Car Show, Vendor and Swap Meet participant entry forms are also available for download off the website. For more information about the Hot Rod Reunions, please call the NHRA Motorsports Museum at 909-622-2133 or visit www.NHRAMuseum.org.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From the Save the Salt website, written by the late Mike Waters. Save the Salt Report (February 2012). Save the Salt, A Brief History from Mike Waters. 
   It has come to our attention that there are a number of folks out there that are not fully aware of what our Save The Salt organization is all about. To that end we have comprised the following brief history of when and why Save The Salt was formed. We hope this tells the story "In a Nutshell" Thanks to Mary West (Secretary of Save The Salt) for putting this history together and thanks to JoAnn Carlson (SCTA/BNI Office) for forwarding the note to us from a gentleman who is a new competitor at Bonneville. He said that he knew Save The Salt was important but he wondered what it was. By the way, he sent a donation along with his inquiry. .Save The Salt, a brief history: During the (1930-1940) era the Bonneville Salt Flats was able to support the weight of 10-ton twin-engine streamliners that roared down the 13.5-mile long Race Courses. The Hot Rods roared onto the salt flats in 1949 with the first Speed Week event and have run every year since. Of course a few years were missed due to weather. 
   By the early 1960's the pioneers of Land Speed Racing began to notice subtle changes in the surface of the raceway. There were discussions of why the surface seemed to be getting weaker and that this unique body of land was shrinking. We were able to get only as much as 7 miles of decent salt for our courses, if we were lucky. It wasn't long before fingers were pointed at the mining industry on the south side of interstate 80. Owned by Kaiser Chemical, their operations covered some 50 sq. miles of the salt flats. Rick Vesco, our first chairman of Save The Salt, spearheaded the effort to meet with Utah State and Federal Government officials as well as the Chemical Company to resolve the problem of salt depletion. The goal was to return the salt that was accumulating in their settling ponds at the mining facility to the Raceway. These early cries for help continued until 1989 when the Save the Salt Organization was founded and struggled to achieve recognition as they began to see the heavy toll the mining industry was taking on the salt flats. 
   In the meantime Kaiser Chemical had sold the operation to Reilly Chemical and a new 20-year lease for mining had been signed. The once healthy 18 plus inches of salt had become so fragile that the Race Courses had to be moved farther and farther east. Running on the long International Race Course was no longer possible. Reilly Industries was forcing water through canals crisscrossing the flats into their evaporation ponds from which potash was extracted. It was estimated that the process was taking an estimated 850,000 tons of salt from the flats each year. The Save the Salt Board has members from the Southern California Timing Assn (SCTA) / Bonneville Nationals Inc (BNI) and Utah Salt Flats Racers Assn (USFRA). This group was able to negotiate a restoration agreement in 1997. 
   Working hand in hand with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Reilly Chemical Co. they began to work together to return salt from the ponds. The Lay down Project was to reverse the process by pumping brine water back onto the salt flats at the rate of 1.5 million tons of salt each year for 5 years. The BLM, Reilly Chemical and the Racers embraced the plan. It was a giant step forward with Government and Industry working together. From the beginning of the pumping project racers began to notice changes in the surface. By the end of the 5-year pumping plan the racers were able to get back to running on the old International Course. Though not as long, there was a noticeable difference in the hardness and durability of the racecourses and on a few occasions we were able to get as much as an 11 mile course.
   Once again the Potash Plant has been sold. Intrepid Industries is now the owner and has shown an interest in our quest to have a healthy Bonneville Salt Flats and a strong racecourse surface. They showed their support by once again starting the pumping process the first of February 2005. We commend them for their efforts. The Save the Salt Board is committed to working with both the BLM and Intrepid Industries. While there is still a lot more to be done, our vigilance appears to have paid off, not just for the racing competitors but also by preserving this historical natural treasure, The Bonneville Salt Flats, for future generations to come. 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

STAFF NOTES: It seems that I publish this old article of mine on a constant basis whenever a racetrack is in peril. So far I have gotten mostly kind comments, but absolutely no action from it. In other words, people agree that something must be done and that the article addresses their concerns, but the bottom line is that they are unwilling to get involved. That means we usually lose the racetrack or drag strip and moan about it. Then the next racetrack is imperiled and we go through this agonizing stage all over again. Some of my friends ask me; “Why do you even try, you know they won’t do anything?” But for some of us the fight has to go on.
                            --------------------
Gone Racin’…on politics in Motorsports racing. Commentary by Richard Parks, photographic consultant Roger Rohrdanz.  November 3, 2006.
   Hot rodders and motor racing fans often pucker up their nose and squint their eyes whenever the word politics and religion are mentioned. “We don’t like to discuss such issues because they cause arguments,” they say. Then, a few moments later the conversation changes to, isn’t it sad that they’re closing another oval track or drag strip to build more homes or shopping malls? The answer to the question is no, it isn’t sad that they are building something on the wreck and ruin of a great racing facility, but what is sad is that hot rodders, racers and fans are so na´ve. The truth is that we are losing tracks in the more populated areas not because builders are so greedy to build homes but because racers are unwilling to fight to keep them open. I have visited with racing groups in vain efforts to keep our racing facilities alive. Most of the time, it is only a feel good effort on the part of the organizers who have a need to vent. They know the task is daunting and they are looking for a scapegoat to hang the coat of despair and blame on before they retreat to their garages and dream of the glories of the past. If that is what you want to do, then be my guest. Wallowing in self-pity and blaming others will get you through that cold wintry day and ease that worthless feeling in the pit of your stomach that you failed.
   But if you are not into a narcissistic urge to pity yourself and your sport, what can you do? Politics. That’s right, good old fashioned, down in the mud, filthy politics. You’ve got to use the very techniques and means that others are using to close your tracks, in order to save them from destruction. You can’t hide from the concept. Wherever you get two or more people together you have political intrigue going, or haven’t you discovered that when dealing with the wife, kids, friends, neighbors and boss. Everybody has their own special needs, and cannot readily see the needs of others. We are convinced that we are right, and if the other person could only see what we see then they would change their opinion and agree with us. That, in a nutshell, is politics. It is the constant urge in us that tries to manipulate others to agree with our opinion, and when we opt not to continue the fight, we surrender what we believe in. We have lost racetracks because we have let others, with their ideas, prevail in the public fight over motor racing. But the question is
what can we do? I will present a solution that has been mentioned before.
   The first concept to grasp is that everyone is right. You are right to want a racetrack to race on or watch your favorite sport. The land developer is right to want to make a profit by building homes or shopping malls. The homeowner is right to want a place to live. The second concept is that politics is mainly about power. We can’t get away from this nasty word. Everything we do is based on power; that is, one side will always prevail over the other side in a dispute. Power can be used for good or evil, and conversely, the person that refuses to use power concedes it to others to be used for good or evil. Therefore you cannot say that
the opposition did an evil thing, for you conceded the power to him to do that evil deed. You did not contest him. You did not defeat the councilman, or the land developer, or the neighbor who always complained of noise and traffic. You let them prevail, and then you blamed them, and not yourself. If everyone is right and power should be attained and used, then the question is, why didn’t you defend your views, and seek to use your power to keep what you wanted? Why did you withdraw and give up what you desired? Perhaps the answer lies more with ignorance than with cowering in the face of opposition. All right, if we have the will and the drive to keep our tracks open, then what can we do?
   The next thing to understand is how our system of laws and politics work. We have a system that is simple enough. Fifty percent of the votes of the electorate plus an extra vote will ensure that we will get what we want. But it is more complex than that, because our system of governing has many layers, from the Federal government on down to the local level. Then the courts weigh in with their views on whether the laws and the elections pass the test of Constitutionality. They can override the local will of the people. Lobbyists infuse money into the political landscape and it is hard to know what that will do to your project. To keep a racetrack open you have to convince the local zoning boards, the City, County, State and sometimes the Federal government. Then there are groups who are not part of the governing process, but who are powerful enough to exert a great pressure on government, such as the environmentalists. But contrary to what people believe, you do not have to corral 50 percent plus 1 vote to win your argument. You only have to control 5% or less. Let’s look at some examples. A typical city where our racetracks are located might have 50,000 residents, of which half are eligible voters. They will elect a mayor and 4 or 6 council members. It is always an uneven number. Usually, only about 25% of the residents, who are eligible to vote, will actually cast a ballot. That means that out of the 50,000 residents, 1/4 of the 25,000 voters will cast a ballot, or roughly 6000. Three or four spots are up for re-election every 2 years, and you usually see about 8 to 10 people running for a seat. The range of votes will be from 3500 down to just a handful of votes. We can’t do much to stop candidate A who has those 3500 votes in his pocket, or candidate B with his 2500, but candidate C with 1500 and candidate D with 1000 votes are very vulnerable to losing and need every vote available.
   Now, can you overcome your aversion and hatred of politics long enough to see that if you combine with your fellow racers, friends and family members, that you can exert enough power to affect the outcome of a political race and therefore your chances of keeping your favorite racetrack? What do you need? 100 allies is the number at this level, in this city, to effect change. Your buddies have wives, husbands, sons, fathers, neighbors and friends in the city, and if each can find 4 more supporters you can bring the numbers into play. 500 votes taken away from candidate C or D and given to E or F can make all the difference. When your group talks to the candidates in the race you must never overtly threaten someone. It is always posed in the positive. 
We would love to support you in your bid, because we feel that you would support us in keeping our racetrack alive and well in our community, isn’t that right? The threat or punishment is that you are seen talking to ALL of the candidates, and your votes will be voted in a bloc, and not broken up. The really wonderful part of politics is that there is a vote going on every two years, somewhere close to where we are, and we are invited to attend. If someone goes back on their word, they have to pay for that by the loss of our support.
   It’s even sweeter on a larger scale. A typical House of Representative’s seat is usually decided on a vote count that rarely exceeds 200,000 voters. The two parties split 90% of the total, and the victor is lucky if he get 46% of the total amount of the votes in his district, to 44% for his major opponent. That means that winning candidate A received 92,000 votes to losing candidate B with 88,000 votes. Not all races are this close, but a surprising number are decided by such a margin. With 4000 votes separating the winner from the loser, let’s look at our formula of 4 voters tagging along for every member of our group. In this case, we have organized from many cities and we have found 1000 car racing zealots who will stick together and vote as a block, even though that means that we will have to put aside our feelings and literally
vote for the devil. Each of our 1000 allies in the SAVE THE RACETRACK COMMITTEE has committed to convincing their wives, husbands, family, friends and neighbors to vote with them. The leaders of STRC have visited with the two top candidates to express their views and to sound out the parties on their willingness to support the idea of racetracks in their areas. The STRC leaders have also made a demand on the candidates for financial support from the government to help continue and support motorsport racing in their districts. With 1000 members, and 4000 supporters, the STRC has changed the dynamics of the election. It doesn’t take 100,000 rabid electors to get your way. You can do it with a fraction of the total number of voters. In fact, any number can have an effect on the candidates who are within such a close range, that defeat and victory will be determined by little things, such as those fighting to keep open a racetrack. Organize your committees today and fight back against the interests opposed to your favorite hobby, or withdraw to the sofa and the remote and watch the professional races thousands of miles away. It’s your choice, but whatever you decide to do, stop bellyaching about it being someone else’s fault.
Gone Racin’ is at RNPARKS1@JUNO.COM.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

OLD 66. By Le Roi Tex Smith 
   Frankly, I don’t know what the fascination/obsession is. Talking here about old US Route 66, or as it has become misconstrued, The Mother Road. Mother of what? Yeah, it ran all the way from Chicago to the Pacific ocean in Santa Monica. But it wasn’t all that romantic for those of us who used it, usually under duress, and it certainly didn’t have all those TV dramas portrayed on that TV show some years past. It was a hard surface road through sometimes inhospitable territory, and for those of us cursed to follow the thread, it was a journey. Not a tour. 
   I was four years old when I first made a short trip on that concrete way, and I remember parts of the trip vividly. Mom and I had gone up to Springfield, Missouri with her brother-in-law on a business trip. We were running some whisky to a thirsty sheriff in our small eastern Oklahoma county. Well, the sheriff and his cronies, the mayor and several business men. 
   You see, my uncle was a gambling man. He ran a floating crap game, back alley poker, and as a fill-in, supplier of the elixer to several prominent locals. It all worked rather well, back in those depression days, and uncle always drove a new Ford car. Well, near new since he much preferred a two door l934 Ford sedan, which he owned several of. It worked this way. The sheriff would come by and advise us that the state cops were going to pull a raid on such and such a day or week. Oklahoma was a dry state, so that even after the national prohibition fiasco, spirits were discouraged. Oklahoma was also known as the Indian nation, which played to the teetotalers, as well.   
   Whatever, once in a while, maybe every three months or so, the sheriff would have to let my uncle be raided by the state cops, who would take whatever stash of booze was in the house, and they would also confiscate the car. So, a hint and we knew to get most of the alcohol out of the house, and have the car handy on the front yard. In they would swoop, with cops hanging on running boards, careen through the house, grab three of four bottles of hootch, and take the car. My uncle left the keys in the ignition lock for their convenience, and we would walk the alley down to the Ford dealer (also tractors, tillers, and things agricultural), where there would be another low mileage, used l934 Ford Tudor waiting. Always in grey or black. It was kind of a standing order thing with the dealer. Since my uncle was one of the most bucks up dudes in eastern Oklahoma, the whole affair was written off as business costs. 
   So, up to Springfield, get a load of “Mickey’s” and backroads down through the edge of Arkansas and over into Lee’s Creek to our place. Sometimes, however, we would return via Claremore and Tulsa, visiting relation on the way, and taking 66 because it was faster. Not a freeway, of course, but much better than those little country lanes. Much of the pavement was cement, important in the states with lots of rainfall. Even so, concrete breakup was common enough, and back then it wasn’t unusual to find a curve that was banked opposite the curve, supposedly for water runoff. Come on one of those doozies at over 20mph and it became a sideshow act. 
   Much of the time, those of us Okies who couldn’t afford shoes much less real gasoline (meaning, most all of us), the gasoline of selection was drip. Or maybe even casing head. Someday remind me to tell you about these fuels. Whatever, for those of the dustbowl era, Route 66 was simply the way to California, and the Golden State was where a person could most likely get a job. And something to eat. To get a good perspective of that time, look up the book, and movie, Grapes of Wrath. Been there, Done that! 
   When I first went way west on 66, it was middle of the back seat in a near new l934 Ford Fordor. One of my uncles had gone out three years earlier, and was sniping for gold in the old fields. He did good, bought a car, and came to get me and mom and my new stepdad. When we pulled out of Cherokee country, we had a small trunk wedged between the seats, a mattress roped to the top, and three canvas waterbags, one on the back and two hanging off the front bumper brackets. Do I remember right that there was a drawing of a camel on the bag? 
   Most of the drive from eastern Oklahoma through to early New Mexico was flat, and not very interesting. Once into NM, though, things began to liven up, especially with those big old highway signs touting roadside attractions. Until you got well into New Mexico, the gas stations and cabin places and cafes were pretty much the same. Outside Duke City (named for the Duke of Albuquerque, I once heard) the billboards were proclaiming that genuine Indian blankets and jewelry were ahead. Sometimes l0 miles, sometimes l00 mile. Then, after Albuquerque the “Trading Posts” started to appear, as did the “Next Gas ll5 miles” warnings. Sobering. And, although the ambient temps stayed much as in Oklahoma the water content in the air lessened markedly.  
   One water bag was repositioned to hang off that radiator cap dog, so that any evaporation of the canvas might help cool the radiator. And, driving late into the night as well as still-dark-thirty morning starts helped to make life inside the Ford more bearable. Back then, roadside cabins (not motels, yet) were usually a buck a night, way more than we could afford, so we made do. The women took the car seats, I got the trunk top, and the men each took a running board. When you gotta, you do! It was getting a bit sparse between watering holes out across the desert on old 66, and that hasn’t changed a lot since. But what we can now knock off in a long day, say 600 miles, we couldn’t so easily do back in the Thirties. Stop for balogna sandwiches under a convenient tree, the men would scrape up small branches for a fire and coffee, water from the bags for me. 
   In Arizona it got worse, with more signs alerting us to “Live snakes” and “Pre-historic turtles”, as well as ice and gas. The oasis was usually just a shack with a long 6-foot fence fronting the rock scrabble driveway. You seen one, you seen ‘em all! But the painted desert was always interesting, although it never changed, nor did the big meteor crater. Finally, breaking out of the hills down to the California border seemed like such a miracle. A very, very hot miracle, which remains as toasty today. The joke back then was that all us Okies had to stop and dip in the Colorado River, just so we would smell like the Californians. 
   From the border into San Bernardino was just more of the grueling sameness, then, when we lit into the mountains it abruptly changed. The weather was kinder, and there was lots more traffic on 66. Even today, you can follow along some of this old highway smack up against the San Gabriel mountains, but it is much quicker to do the modern freeways. Nope, Highway 66 was never a Mother Road for me, and what used to take nearly a week is now only a couple of long days to Oklahoma, and another long one up to Chicago. Neat thing is, the cops don’t stop you at the border now, looking for contraband. Farther west, they look for hidden banana’s. Too, bathing in the Colorado River on western journeys is no longer necessary! Still, you might want to find a couple canvas water bags. Just in case!

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Norm Rapp Story, Part 2.  By Spencer Simon, SLSRH Northern California reporter.
     "Zoom! - Zoom!  Norm Rapp Racing Equipment," are the words I hear when he answers the phone at his business in the southern part of San Francisco.  Meeting Norm was a real prize; I've known him for over 20 years ago when I needed parts and his help in building my Pat Warren Quick Change rear end.  At the time I never thought that I would be writing about him now.  Since the age of two Norm has followed in the racing heritage of his father and he is still at it.      
     Norm is one of the originals of the true Gasoline Alley guys from the 1950's era.  He was a Midget and Sprint car racer and racing parts supplier, but I didn't know that he was involved with the Indy 500 race cars.  During the 1956-'57 racing season he was hired by George Bignotti.  George is a long time friend, racer and top mechanic himself.  Bignotti built race cars for many high end racers such as A. J Foyt.  Norm and Bignotti worked on Johnny Boyd's Bowes Seal Fast Special Indy 500 cars in 1956 and 1957; as well as with another professional Indy driver - Freddie Agabashian.  My neighbor and close friend of Norm Rapp was Jimmy Correia, from Hayward, California.  Jimmy spent a little time at Indy also with two-time Indy winner Bill Vukovich, who won at the Indy 500 in 1953 and again in 1954 with Howard Keck, Stu Hilborn (with his Fuel Injection Special).  Norm and Jim knew each other for many years.      
     Jimmy Correia has a remarkable historical background.  He had a picture of Amelia Earhart with his uncle.  He remembers that Amelia rubbed his hair before her last and final take off.  Jimmy Correia learned his mechanical skills from Chickie Hiroshima who in turn was taught by race car builder and designer Harry Arminius Miller.  As I am writing this, Norm and Jim have got their spline in place to go out and race midgets today.  Another Racer who was in the Hayward area back in the 1950's was the 1955 Indy 500 winner Bob Sweikert.  In the earlier years, Sweikert spent a lot of time with race car builder Hillary Govia.  They were all gifted, talented and incredibly experienced drivers.  They raced when times were hard and there were tragic accidents back then.  It remains the heyday of auto racing for many.  Norm and his friends still enjoy racing; its their passion and life, and they are not about to quit.  
                                                          -----------------------
"IN THE BUSINESS OF ZOOM."  Story by Gene Leonard.  Photographs by Jay Watson, from the Norm Rapp Archives. 

     Like most other places in the 21st century, the oval race tracks are controlled by digital gauges that have replaced the once-trusty "feeler" types.  Oil pressure needles that were watched closely with one eye as the driver made his turns around the racetrack have been thrown out in favor of a LED version. There was a time when a race car would roll carefully up onto the scales with the driver waiting patiently as the tumblers, pendulums and gears would creak out the full-trim numbers.  It's fair to say that racing has lost some of its intuition and old time flare. Perhaps it has also lost some of its soul; a little of that gut feeling that separated a true racer from someone else who could merely get behind the wheel of a race car today.   To step through the door of Norm Rapp Racing Equipment in San Francisco's Excelsior district is to be reminded of how powerful the connection is between a real racer and his race car can be; and how long it can last. How that connection can ensure that the heart and soul of oval track racing will not soon be forgotten. 
          Norm's shop, its old grocery store roots still evident by the glass cooler cases filled with race parts, is cool and shady inside.  The smell of fresh tires and old grease fills the air.  Sprint car parts are beautifully cast, formed or hewn from magnesium, steel and aluminum and stacked in piles that nearly reach the ceiling.  Amid these mountains of stuff sits Norm Rapp, younger in spirit than his near-eighty years and sportin' the gleam in his eye that only comes from staying sharp and being wise enough to know that a day spent away from his beloved racing is a day closer to the Long Sleep   That gleam in his eye is worth pondering.  There are traits shared by racers, no matter what particular strain of the sport they pursue, which allows them to do what they do.  A certain "Devil May Care" attitude backed up by a few metric tons of "live for today" tends to ensure that most don't enjoy a very long (albeit action-packed) life.  Norm managed to outlive most of the stereo-types and that gleam seems to almost dance as he talks about building a new car, the compounds of different tires, vintage Kurtis motors and sprint car racing at large.  If that light exuding from Norm was animated, if it actually had a sound, it would probably sound like a "ZOOM".      
     If there's such a thing as Racing Royalty, Norm Rapp is due to be crowned with something.  Growing up as his father's son in the house across the street from the shop he's been working in for forty years, Gene Rapp's boy gained a lasting love of automobile racing.  While his dad built a reputation for working on race engines and the track roadsters of the day at his service station (after hanging up his own leather racing helmet to concentrate on raising a family), a young Norm tagged along to the Big Car races that were flourishing in pre-WWII Northern California.  As was the tradition of the day, young men grew up quickly at an early age and Norm was running his dad's parts department by his twelfth birthday.     
     It wasn't long before young Rapp was foraging his own way in the racing world.  He got caught up in the newly-formed Midget car racing - a smaller and lighter version of the existing car of the day - and would crew for a team usually three nights a week at different local tracks.  By 1948, to the chagrin of his father, Norm took his own Drake-powered Midget and was off to the races.  Gene, with a few grisly crashes burned into his racing memory, wasn't exactly pleased with his son's decision to get so heavily involved with the driving responsibilities of car ownership, but finally helped Norm buy a flathead-powered Kurtis Kraft car in 1949.     
     Anyone who's ever gotten behind the wheel of a racecar, whether on the go-kart tracks of beach towns or the dragstrips of the NHRA circuit, knows about "The Bug."  It's not something that can be caught with a sticky tape hanging from the back porch, but a tingle in the spine that can only be experienced by G-forces pushing the head back or the ass sideways as an internal-combustion engine is catapulted down the track.  The Bug is what pushed Norm Rapp, in 1951, to win the first of what would be more than 40 races over the next 16 years.  That barely-explainable force was also responsible for Norm's decision to make racing more than a driving career.  Norm Rapp Racing Equipment opened its doors in 1953 and is still supplying much-needed parts, advice and the occasional bullshit sessions that keep any local racing scene alive and well.
     Over the years, Norm concentrated on the dirt and asphalt tracks of the western states' sprint car industry.  He raced, supplied parts, built cars and even developed his own advancements in equipment.  A leather face mask that Norm saw a need for and refined to the point of commissioning a local leather man to manufacture was ultimately sold through popular parts catalogs.  Rapp-engineered cooling parts for flatheads also made their way to racers always looking for an advantage on the track.  Partnering with engine man Al Gonzales, Norm was instrumental in the development of the ALGON flathead fuelie setup and numerous other trick parts that really could only be concocted by someone who knew what a car would need from years of behind-the-wheel experience.  Norm also supplied fuel and fresh tires to racers trackside and became the guy to look for when a little more support was needed in order to go fast and turn left.      
     Among the parts, both new and vintage, at the shop on the hill, are vestiges of racing days gone by.  There's a photo of Norm upside down and flying through the air in a sprint car, caught on film by a newspaper reporter.  "You never really land on your head. It's usually the nose or the rear of the car that touches the ground when you're upside down," Norm casually explains.  There are trophies commemorating various wins and examples of Norm's much-appreciated racing inventions.  But there's one artifact, one crown jewel in Norm's unintentional collection: Gene Rapp's leather racing helmet and goggles.  These items were hung up in 1923 at the - ahem - request of Norm's soon-to-be mother after a bad crash by Gene.  "There's where he hit," Norm says as he puts his finger through an angry-looking tear in the oh-so-thin leather.  And is that an old blood stain on the inside?  "Yeah, that's the real article, there," Norm tells us.  As if these two early examples of racing safety equipment weren't impressive enough, there's a dusty, framed print of Gene himself - behind the wheel of his trusty Big Car in the very helmet that Norm holds in his well-worn hands.      
      This helmet and these goggles are much more than just sentimentally valuable family heirlooms.  There's another photo on the shelf of Norm accepting an award for his contributions to the Bay Area Sporting Community.  In that photo he is cradling a crazy, marker-hewn faced, Styrofoam bust wearing his father's equipment.  That small photo speaks volumes about what fuels Norm: an understanding of his racing roots and a soft spoken role as a patriarch of the racing that he dearly loves.  Those two old leather accoutrements are also held dear by everyone who has benefited from Rapp's invaluable contributions to the sport.  They represent a life and a heritage that both gave and were rewarded by a culture of men and their racing machines.  That gleam in Norm's eye that Zoom that keeps him focused on his love of racing, will benefit us all for years to come.     
                                                           -----------------
      On April 2, 2013 I have a meeting with Norm Rapp to interview him.  As I head over to Norm's Racing Equipment shop by the bay in San Francisco, I came around a little twist in the road and see his shop on the corner.  The shop's sign was painted by racer Floyd Busby and says Norm Rapp's Racing Equipment, with familiar words that Arnold Schwarzenegger uses; "I'll Be Back."  Norm Rapp just turned 86 and he hasn't lost his touch as a driver.  His mind is as sharp as it has always been.  I had some pictures that which we talked about which gave me an idea of what his interests were.  We spent about two hours looking at my collection of photos that went back to the 1920's through the 1950's era; around a 100 in all.  He knew all the drivers and met them all.  His father was with all the racers back then and so was Norm.  He grew up with these men and was influenced by them.  Norm still has his 1956 and '57 Bowes Seal Fast outfit and memorabilia from that time.                   
     He told me that if he had the chance he would do this all over again.  He is now a preparing his Vintage Racing class Midget and hopes to be ready by September.  He has to get all the old parts in prime condition and running in the Offenhauser engine.  The entire drive train and car is being built to specs.  Norm found out something about his father about a year or two ago.  Gene Rapp was in a terrible accident.  Gene woke up in the hospital and learned that a couple of drivers from the same track were killed.  The people at the track asked Gene to make a speech about the two that were killed at the track while he was seriously injured.  The doctor tried to keep Gene in the hospital because of the seriousness of his injuries, but Gene left the hospital and gave the speech.  Then he went back to the hospital to recover.
     Norm's shop does have that smell of racing.  The tires, performance equipments, fuel, parts and more fill up the shop.  There are parts everywhere.   There are multiple awards and several walls full of trophies.  The ceilings are 20 feet high and he needs all of that space for his merchandise.  I like being with this bunch of guys in this group in my area who are in their 80's and 90's.  I found out that their love for racing and the charisma in keeping the group together has survived regardless of their age. 
     As a historian and reporter for the Society of Land Speed Racing Historian Newsletter up in Northern California, I would like to thank Jesse Gregory James from the television and magazines (Jesse James Outlaw Garage, Austin Speed Shop, Monster Garage, and West Coast Choppers Garage Magazine).  Jesse is known for his racing, customs and motorcycles.  I would like to thank Jesse for allowing us to copy an article you have published in the GARAGE magazine, volume Number 10; in crediting Jesse James, his editor Gene Leonard and his photographer Jay Watson for  documenting and preserving the Norm Rapp story.  I would also like to congratulate Jesse James and Alexis DeJoria who were recently married.  I would also like to thank Norm Rapp, Jimmy Correia, Skip Govia, Edris Snipes (Stu Hilborn's daughter), and Carole Sweikert (Bob Sweikert's daughter) for the photos they provided to help finish the story on Norm Rapp.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Evelyn Roth sent in this link that shows all the Indy 500 pace cars from 1911 to the present. http://indymotorspeedway.com/v1/500pace.htm.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Goodguys announces a special new Texas Road Tour this fall that will take hot rodders from Goodguys World Headquarters in Pleasanton, California to the 21st Lone Star Nationals at Texas Motor Speedway. The Goodguys Texas Road Tour blasts off from Pleasanton on Friday, September 27, 2013 and ends at Texas Motor Speedway Thursday, October 3, 2013 covering 1,969 total miles. Our newly built, all yellow, 525-horsepower Goodguys G/RS 1969 Camaro, will pace the tour. The all-inclusive 7-day road tour travels through California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas stopping at the Southwest’s finest rod shops, car collections, museums, race shops and more. There is a one-time entry fee of $1,500 which covers your nightly hotel, most meals (breakfast, lunch and dinner) and commemorative tour booklet. The entry fee also includes two tee shirts, two caps, two decals, entry to the Goodguys 21st Lone Star Nationals October 4-6, 2013 at the Texas Motor Speedway and a special at-event parking area exclusive to Road Tour cars only. 
   Only 50 spots are available and will be sold on a first come, first serve basis. To register online for the Goodguys Texas Road Tour and view the daily itinerary see our website. For questions, contact Ed Capen with Goodguys (e-mail inquiries will be answered as soon as possible) edcapen@good-guys.com or by phone (602) 821-3146. Goodguys Rod and Custom Association will stage 19 dynamic events in 2013 welcoming a wide range of hot rods, customs, muscle cars, trucks and classic cars to the country’s premier event venues. California, Arizona and Texas will host multiple events while the biggie – the Goodguys 16th PPG Nationals returns to the Ohio Expo Center in Columbus, Ohio on July 12-14, 2013. Download the 2013 schedule now. Goodguys Rod & Custom Association, PO Box 9132, Pleasanton, CA 94566 or call (925) 838-9876. Our website is at www.good-guys.com.

line12

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Land Speed Racing Websites:
www.hotrodhotline.com, www.landspeedracing.com

 [Email Land Speed Racing]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Members:

Jonathan Amo, Brett Arena, Henry Astor, Gale Banks, Glen Barrett, Mike Bastian, Lee Blaisdell, Jim Bremner, Warren Bullis, Burly Burlile, George Callaway, Gary Carmichael, John Backus, John Chambard, Jerry Cornelison, G. Thatcher Darwin, Jack Dolan, Ugo Fadini, Bob Falcon, Rich Fox, Glenn Freudenberger, Don Garlits, Bruce Geisler, Stan Goldstein, Andy Granatelli, Walt James, Wendy Jeffries, Ken Kelley, Mike Kelly, Bret Kepner, Kay Kimes, Jim Lattin, Mary Ann and Jack Lawford, Fred Lobello, Eric Loe, Dick Martin, Ron Martinez, Tom McIntyre, Don McMeekin, Bob McMillian, Tom Medley, Jim Miller, Don Montgomery, Bob Morton, Mark Morton, Paula Murphy, Landspeed Louise Ann Noeth, Frank Oddo, David Parks, Richard Parks, Wally Parks (in memoriam), Eric Rickman, Willard Ritchie, Roger Rohrdanz, Evelyn Roth, Ed Safarik, Frank Salzberg, Dave Seely, Charles Shaffer, Mike Stanton, David Steele, Doug Stokes, Bob Storck, Zach Suhr, Maggie Summers, Gary Svoboda, Pat Swanson, Al Teague, JD Tone, Jim Travis, Randy Travis, Jack Underwood and Tina Van Curen, Richard Venza.
 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 1999 - 2012 Hot Rod Hot Line All Rights Reserved
No Portion May Be Used Without Our Written Permission
Contact Us Toll Free (877) 700-2468 or (208) 562-0470
230 S. Cole Rd, Boise, ID 83709