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SOCIETY OF LAND SPEED RACING HISTORIANS
NEWSLETTER 284 - June 4, 2013
Editor: Richard Parks, Rnparks1@Juno.com 
President of the Society: Jim Miller, 1-818-846-5139.
Photographic Editor of the Society
: Roger Rohrdanz, beachtruck@juno.com
Northern California Reporter: Spencer Simon, sparklecraftspecial@yahoo.com
Field Reporter/Historian: Bob Falcon, RFalcon500@aol.com

Click On All Images / Link For more Info / Images

Some Names To Look For In This Newsletter:
GUEST EDITORIAL by “Dyno” Don Batyi; STAFF EDITORIAL, by Richard Parks; I am sad to write that my Dad passed away Wednesday, May 29, 2013; STAFF NOTES: We compile biographies in order to save a person’s life story; I'm sure many of you already know that Pat Berardini passed away on May 29th, but for those who haven't heard yet, I want to relay the news Pat's daughter Susan sent me the other day; I recently did an article on my late friend Jim Feuling; STAFF NOTES: In the last issue of the SLSRH there was a story about Ak Miller by LeRoi “Tex” Smith; Gone Racin’ to…Ak Miller’s Tribute. Story by Richard Parks, photographs by Roger Rohrdanz. June 28, 2005; STAFF NOTES: The following comes from the Jessica Clark Racing Newsletter; DOANE. By Le Roi Tex Smith; Aussie Invader 3 June 2013 - Newsletter; John Hutchinson, from Great Britain, shared this link and article with us from http://www.myrideisme.com/Blog/bloodhound-ssc-update-rolls-royce/; STAFF NOTES: Gil Coraine sent in the following information for events sponsored by the Wally Parks NHRA Motorsports Museum.

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GUEST EDITORIAL by “Dyno” Don Batyi: 
   I received an email from Rex Roden, ACCC, and have included it at the end of this message. It appears that the California Bill AB2001 is not on the agenda for this year. I call it the, “Let's see what we can put over on the people Bill,” and it is dead, at least for this year. I agree with Rex, it will be back next session with different wording. The Sustainable Communities Bill is not good for our Hobby or anything else.  Sincerely, "Dyno" Don Batyi  
   “Good Afternoon, I just received information from the ACCC lobbyist John Caldwell. It appears that the Democratic Party leadership in the California Assembly and Senate are pulling back all bills that have to do with funding Sustainable Communities for now. Although these bills are dead for 2013, I guarantee they will be back in 2014. It appears that the powers to be in the Democratic Party felt some of the heat applied by the car guys and gals and other organizations who were opposed to more taxes. In the hearings the excessive number of proposed ‘Car Tax’ bills and increases in vehicle license fees and car taxes was the topic of discussion several times. AB 1002 and other legislation related to Sustainable Communities is dead now but we must be ready to fight this all over again in 2014. I want to thank you and all the car clubs and individuals who sent letters to the Transportation Committee opposing AB 1002.”
   When I saw AB-2001 Car Tax Bill had a secret sub-account in the DMV's account for monies for "Sustainable Communities" I started to smell corruption and was glad to see it go down. I have since attended a "Sustainable Communities" lecture by Rosa Koire in Redlands, California. Rosa is the author of BEHIND THE GREEN MASK: U.N. AGENDA 21. I have also purchased her book. The U.N. called it "Agenda 21" as they wanted it to be implemented by the world in the 21st century. The U.N. term "Sustainable Development" was created and defined by the U.N. in 1987. The action plan to implement it in the U.S. was signed in 1992 by President Bush. President Clinton started implementing "21" in the U.S. in 1993 by giving the American Planning Association a multi-million dollar grant to write a land use blueprint for the U.S. This was completed in 2002 and is now in use, plus being taught in colleges. California passed SB-375 in 2008 and called their plan "Sustainable Communities."
   Considered "unsustainable" by the U.N. plan are; middle class lifestyle, single family homes, land use, private vehicles, eating meat, air conditioning, electric appliances, and more. California has followed suit in the plan, by appointing a board of unelected officials, the California Air Resource Board. Unelected Boards is what "UN 21" stipulates.  The ARB is to administer the California "Sustainable Communities" plan, as it is called here. This gives the ARB the power to virtually shut down the state from behind the "GREEN MASK." Please keep in mind, there are 5.5 businesses leaving California per week. "Private Vehicles" and "Fossil Fuels" are "unsustainable" and will be replaced by public transportation. That's the end of our Hobby and daily drivers, folks. Plus, you will be living in a high rise apartment or condo downtown, so you won't need them anyway, as you can use the public transportation. This may sound farfetched to you now, but keep in mind this movement has been going on since 1987 and is now happening in California. I can also tell you the zealots at the California ARB will do their very best to make "Sustainable Communities" a reality. I suggest you Google "UN Agenda 21" and the ARB website to find out more.

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STAFF EDITORIAL, by Richard Parks.
     A GREAT caption stands alone as text.  When Roger and I sent in articles to DRIVE Magazine the editors there would chop my 2000 words down to 600, but leave Roger's excellent captions alone.  His few words along with his photos told the story.  Captions are crucial.  They are MORE important that the textual story.  They are even more important today when editor's are cutting back on the size of captions.  A good photographer spends a great deal of time and effort to come up with a GREAT caption.  The caption needs to explain the WHAT, the WHO, the WHERE, the WHEN, sometimes the HOW and the WHY and always CREDIT the owner of the photograph.  Now let's look at how you captioned a particular photograph;
              Norm Rapp's first race car The Hap Jones car of San Francisco, sporting a Drake motorcycle engine.
     Now let's see where you could improve this (what I will add is fictitious just for explanation sake with comments in parenthesis)
              IMG_20130325_0003 (Your catalog number)...Norm Rapp's first race car The Hap Jones car of San Francisco (the WHO), sporting a Drake motorcycle engine (the HOW), at the Oakland Arena (the WHERE), July 16, 1949 (the WHEN), in the Miller 100 Race (the WHAT).  Photograph in the collection of Skip Govia (the ACCREDITATION of the photo).
     If you get into a routine of captioning every photograph the same way you will find that the work goes faster and you won't forget vital details that are important when you put your stories together.  Every photographer has their own system, but what I like about Roger's captions is that he starts out with the CATALOGING information, in this case the IMG_20130325_0003.  It doesn't have to be that long.  It could be as simple as IMG_NR_001, for Norm Rapp photos #1.  The next bit of information is the WHO.  Whom are we mentioning; followed by the HOW or the WHERE, then the WHEN and the WHAT.  The final bit of information is the ACCREDITATION of the photo or who owns it or has it.  Since ownership is such a touchy issue you need to be very clear in this matter.  Is the photo copyrighted?  Then say so.  If it is not copyrighted, but in the public domain, then tell us that.  If it came from your collection or someone else's then that is what you say.  If no owner is known, then be as informative as you can.  Crediting a photograph is more than a courtesy, it is a legal must and when you do it right that tells the public that you are a professional. 
   Now we discuss coding systems for your photographs. Roger must have 100,000 photos by now and Jim probably has nearly that many. I have 50 and they're in five categories, so I'm not much help. A better system of cataloging photographs would certainly help me as one day I will have a lot of family photos to organize. I thought maybe sorting by year, but then how would I inventory or index the photos so that I could easily recall the ones that I wanted. Then I though initials, like NR for Norm Rapp, but what if I had a Nathan Ross, or Nat Robinson and Nick Rahal? Systems are often unique to the photographer, so I asked our staff of Bob, Spencer, Jim and Roger to share their secrets. Roger was the first to respond and here is his system.
   “Let me begin by saying I have a Windows based operating system. It has separate categories for Pictures, Documents, Music, and Videos. When I cover a story or event, I come home with pictures. I name a new picture folder with the date and event name (04-06-13 Del Mar for example). The camera automatically numbers each picture. I put all the pictures and scans related to that event in the folder. I also make a new document/word folder using the same date and event name (04-06-13 Del Mar). I put all the story, notes, and captions related to that event in the folder,” Roger concluded. 

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I am sad to write that my Dad passed away Wednesday, May 29, 2013. He had been (ill) for several months and a fall that caused a neck injury compromised his recovery. My Dad died peacefully with my brother, sister and I at his bedside. My Dad had a very good life; he did all the things he dreamed of doing, and more. The restoration of the 404jr was icing on the cake. We are planning a memorial for my Dad in his backyard, which you know he loved. We are only having immediate family. But if people would like to send a remembrance about my Dad, that would be wonderful to share with my family. They can use my email address; smfoshee@aol.com.  Thanks again, Susan Berardini Foshee
   SUSAN: I am very sorry to hear about your father's passing. He was a wonderful man and a good friend and I will miss him very much. I am grateful that we had a chance to get his story while he was alive and I will re-run that bio at www.landspeedracing.com next week with your comments below. Please keep us updated on any arrangements for a memorial.

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STAFF NOTES: We compile biographies in order to save a person’s life story. Here is Pat and Tony Berardini’s story. 
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Gone Racin’…Berardini Brothers. Story by Richard Parks, photographs by Roger Rohrdanz. October 31, 2006.
   Pat and Tony Berardini raced in the early days of drag racing in the early 1950’s, establishing a reputation for skill, speed and consistency. Their parents, Carlo and Philomena Berardini, emigrated from Italy before WWI and settled in Southwest Los Angeles near 80th Street and Avalon Boulevard where their children attended elementary school and then on to Fremont High School. Tony was born in 1915, Pat in 1927, followed by two more brothers and a sister. Carlo encouraged his sons to work hard and Pat began working for Pontrelli’s Automotive at the age of 10, sweeping up floors and learning the trade. This was during the height of the Great Depression and any job was highly sought after. The neighborhood teens met over at the Clock Drive-In, in Huntington Park, where they swapped tales of fast hot rods and what was going on at the dry lakes and on the streets. Pat was already skilled at custom car work and auto painting when WWII broke out and was anxious to do his part. 
   He joined the Merchant Marines in 1945, when he turned 17. A young George Barris took the job he left behind at Jones’ Body, Fender and Custom Shop. Pat recalls the trip to the Philippines, "we were anchored offshore at Leyte Gulf, unloading war cargo, when news of the Japanese surrender came, after the U.S. dropped the atomic bomb on Japan. Everybody was so happy that night. All the ships anchored in the Leyte Gulf turned on their largest searchlights and some were also blinking in Morse code 'V' for victory with their lights. It was a sight to see. There were a lot of happy tears." He would never forget that night. Pat returned home and joined the Navy for two more years with a couple of his buddies. He went to San Diego for his training, and was then transferred to the Aleutian Islands in Alaska, one of the roughest duties in the Navy. The weather was always bad and the seas were rough. He served aboard the USS SARSI ATF 111, a 205-foot fleet tug, and one of his favorite duties was steering the ship in and out of port. The USS SARSI towed ships, and did repair work on all types of Navy and cargo vessels. He was honorably discharged in December of 1947.
   Pat dreamed about opening his own custom body and paint shop and drew a picture of that shop while he was in the Navy, which he still has hanging in his home. He opened his auto sales business in 1949 with his brother Tony in southwest Los Angeles, at 84th and Figueroa Streets. They specialized in early model Fords from 1932 through 1940. Pat did the repairing and painting and the business was a success from the start. When he was ten years old, his brother Tony had bought a ’29 Ford Roadster, and painted flames in black and white, and the #3 on the doors. Remembering that car, Pat purchased a ’32 Ford roadster and painted his ‘32 racecar to match Tony’s earlier roadster. It had a 270 C.I. engine with two carburetors and turned times in the middle to high 90’s. Howard Johansen, of Howard Cams, built his next engine in 1952. 
   Johansen increased the engine to 296 C.I. with 3 carburetors, and the speeds increased to 105 mph. In the latter part of 1953, Iskenderian came out with a new cam named the 404. He renamed his car the 404jr in honor of Isky's new cam and for his son Pat Jr.  Pat got Nick Harrell of Harrell Speed Shop to build the engine for the 404jr. It had a 3/8 bore, 5/8 stroke billet crank, Harrell racing heads, Edelbrock 4 carburetor intake manifold, Harman/Collins magneto and a 314 cubic inch engine. They turned speeds in the 107 to 114 mph range, but the car was super quick and the set-up gave them a quicker ET (elapsed time). The 404jr raced very successfully in the street roadster gas class. Pat entered a big meet in 1954 at the Bakersfield Open Gas Roadster Meet, in the gas open-altered class. It was one of the biggest races ever up to that time in the gas class, and to be competitive, they stripped the fenders off to make it lighter and to improve wind resistance. Tony was the over-all winner against cars that were much lighter. Tony wanted his own racecar so he bought a ’29 Ford roadster to race in the open altered gas class. He used the same size engine as Pat used for the 404jr and painted #7 on the doors, and the Berardini brothers now had two very fast drag roadsters. Dick Lenarz, Russ Lenarz, Vic Pollaccia and Al Pollaccia were their pit crew and close friends. 
   The Berardini Brothers raced for the thrill of racing. Almost every Sunday they raced at Santa Ana, Saugus or other drag strips, winning about 80 percent of their races. One competitor told them, "The only time we beat you was when you didn’t show up." The Berardini brothers show up in the race results of the early 1950’s, dominating their classes. They raced against Creighton Hunter, who had a very hot roadster and was always first off the line. In the hot fuel classes there were such names as Ollie Morris, the Bean Bandits, Chrisman Brothers, Dick Kraft, Otto Ryssman and Doug Hartelt. By the mid-1950’s change was on the horizon. Don Bell, a good friend of the brothers, was fatally injured at El Mirage dry lake, using their 404jr engine. With their business booming and their families growing they sold their racecars and moved out of the Los Angeles area to Garden Grove, California. After 40 years in the business, Pat finally closed down Berardini Brothers Auto Sales in 1990. 
   They were honored at the 12th Annual California Hot Rod Reunion in October of 2003, with the very first NHRA Golden Age Award in recognition of their "dedication, innovation and achievement during the infancy of organized drag racing." Roger and Sissy Morrison, who restored and unveiled this famous car at the NHRA museum, in January 2005, now own Pat’s beloved 404jr. The 404jr was awarded the prestigious Bruce Meyer Award at the Grand National Roadster Show. The 404jr was also picked to be one of Ford Motor Company’s 75 Most Significant ’32 Ford Hot Rods. “I was lucky I didn’t get killed,” said Pat. “Someone said I wasn’t going fast enough, so I shoved my foot all the way into the plywood floorboard and it got stuck, and I was way past the finish line before I hit the kill switch.” Tony has since passed away, but Pat is still active in the hot rodding community.
 Gone Racin’ is at RNPARKS1@JUNO.COM

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I'm sure many of you already know that Pat Berardini passed away on May 29th, but for those who haven't heard yet, I want to relay the news Pat's daughter Susan sent me the other day. While the news is sad, Susan pointed out that, "He had a good life, did all the things he dreamed of doing and more." Can't top that. For those readers who are too young to remember Pat and his late brother Tony and how they took the drag strips by storm in the 1950s as The Berardini Brothers racing team, I encourage you to take a moment and check out the short biography of their exploits at: http://www.hotrodhotline.com/feature/guestcolumnists/richardscorner/07berardinibros/.  Then take a moment to pay tribute to Pat Berardini, a truly decent man. Thanks, Roger Harrell

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I recently did an article on my late friend Jim Feuling. Go to WWW.MCNEWS.COM, JUNE 2013 issue. He was quite a pioneer and forward thinker. Ken Freund
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Legends of Motorcycling Jim Feuling, by Ken Freund.  Photographs courtesy of Luke Leatherman and can be seen at www.mcnews.com, June 2013 issue.  Approval to republish given by Dave Searle, Editor-in-Chief of Motorcycle Consumer News.
     James Joseph Feuling—or Jim to his friends—was an engineer, inventor, fabricator, pilot, writer, publisher, racer, and accomplished researcher/developer in engine design and fluid dynamics. He was deeply involved in developing and improving internal-combustion engines and other vital components in motorcycling, automotive and aviation circles.
     Jim went to high school in Honolulu and later attended Southwestern College and University of the Seven Seas. He also served in the U.S. Army Special Forces.
     Jim was quite precocious; at the age of five he started riding motorcycles and was flying airplanes by age 11. He raced and prepared his own motorcycles, and at age 16 won the California State TT Championship. After that, Jim started building and racing sports cars and off-road vehicles. Among Jim’s off-road racing honors, he received the SCORE “Mechanic of the Year” award in 1976.
     Jim founded Feuling R&D/Advanced Technologies in 1974. I got to know him in the late 1980s, and kept in touch until he succumbed to pancreatic cancer in 2002. Jim Feuling had scores of patents and at various times held R&D contracts with Harley-Davidson, Chevrolet, Chrysler, Ford, John Deere, Oldsmobile, and Nissan, plus various aircraft manufacturers including Cessna, Mooney and his own company Quickie.
     His business was located at 2521 Palma Drive in Ventura, California. The 28,000 sq. ft. facility was well-equipped with state-of-the-art machines to design, test, and build prototypes.
     Feuling was also very much inspired by the inventor, electrical engineer, physicist, and futurist Nikola Tesla. In fact, Jim was the President of the Tesla Book Company, Inc. also located in Ventura.
     Feuling W3 “Warlock” Engine.  Feuling’s best-known contribution to the motorcycling world is probably the W3 engine, which was based on a Harley- Davidson Twin Cam 88. Jim liked Harley’s V-twins, but recognized that they could use more power. Utilizing his knowledge of radial aircraft engines (he owned quite a few), Feuling decided to add an extra cylinder, positioned low for an optimal center of gravity.
     Fueling’s W3 followed radial aircraft engine practice, using a middle “master” connecting rod and two “slave” rods, attaching one on each side to the master rod. This design gave an instant 50% increase in displacement.
     Feuling’s W3 engine project was originally done with Harley-Davidson factory support, but after the early stages, the Motor Company backed out. The initial design used original H-D parts and only required a few additional new pieces, but after Harley-Davidson abandoned the project, Feuling switched to mainly aftermarket components along with some parts that were made in-house. He received a patent for the W3 engine on December 14, 1999.
     Feuling also designed the W-3’s camshafts and it used two-valve Max Flow cylinder heads with Hi Velocity ports, AR (Anti-Reversion) headers and CVX mufflers; all his patents. Three Dellorto 40mm flat-slide carburetors metered the air-fuel.
     A modified Dyna frame mounted the W3 engine, with its fork rake set at 34 to allow room for the front cylinder. A custom swingarm held a 200mm rear tire. Jesse James of West Coast Choppers made the fenders and gas tank. Steve Storz of Storz Performance supplied the Ceriani fork and a Barnett clutch fed power to a JIMS fivespeed transmission—all three firms located in Ventura County. The W3 “kit” was to sell for $19,500. Cory Ness also built a custom bike around a Feuling W3 powerplant.
     Displacement was initially 2327cc or 142 cu.in., with a 4.0" (101.6 mm) bore and 3.875" (98.4 mm) stroke, but it was subsequently increased to 2458cc or 150 cu. in., by changing to a 4.0" stroke. Feuling was also testing a 185 cu. in. (3032cc) version, and a huge 4015cc or 245 cu. in. racing kit was planned.  Fueling rated the 150 cubic-inch engine at 150 horsepower @ 5,000 rpm, with 210 lb.-ft. of torque @ 3000 rpm. The W3 engine was smooth, torquey and had a unique sound reminiscent of a radial engine. I had an opportunity to ride a prototype, which was easily the most powerful Harley-based street motorcycle I’ve ever ridden.
     Feuling’s Oldsmobile Indy engine gave the highest specific output ever—1270 hp from 121 cu. in. in 1988. Feuling’s shocking “W3” engine was built in various sizes, and the 150 cu. in. version above produced a smooth-running 150 hp with 210 lb.-ft. of torque. Harley initially backed the project but later dropped out. However he also designed the cylinder heads for the H-D Evo Big Twins, which used his patented anti-reversion exhaust ports.
     Feuling also developed an engine for American Honda’s high-mileage streamliner which achieved 500 mpg at 55 mph.
     Around 1990, Feuling produced four-valve heads for the Harley Evolution engine, and later sold the rights to market them. Fueling also developed the Super- Pump oil pump and HP+ lifters for H-D Twin Cam engines. Three of Feuling’s former employees continue to make and sell performance products for Harleys (including those developed by Jim) through Feuling Parts in Mojave, CA. (www .feulingparts.com; 866-966-9767.)
     Inside Feuling’s Ventura headquarters, there were dozens of interesting vehicles and engines, including an operational military tank, and many car, motorcycle and aircraft engines, including a huge brand new spare radial originally intended for Howard Hughes’ “Spruce Goose.”
     Feuling was a friend of, and raced against, Calvin Rayborn in his early days. Later, I saw one of Cal’s XR750 race bikes prominently displayed in his living room.
     Jim Feuling was on the Board of Directors of the San Diego Automotive Museum. His professional memberships included the Society of Automotive Engineers, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, American Chemical Society, International Society for Optical Engineering and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers. He was also elected a Fellow of the Institute of Advanced Engineering, was named a “Distinguished Speaker” for the SAE Industrial Lectureship Program, and made numerous presentations to these professional associations.
     During the 1990s, Jim lectured at the Superflow Advanced Engine Technology Conferences four different times. His seminars included, “Overlap Phenomenon in the Four-Stroke-Cycle Engine” in 1990; and “High Efficiency Sound Attenuation for Internal Combustion Engines” at the 1991 conference. Later, at the 1995 conference his topic was “Mechanical Octanes” and at the 1997 conference he described the cutting edge “ULEV (Ultra Low Emission) High Performance Engine/Vehicle.”
     Feuling also set numerous land speed records, and was a member of the Bonneville 200 MPH Club and its even more exclusive 300 MPH Chapter. Feuling’s streamliner ran at Bonneville’s Salt Flats in a three-wheel configuration (it could also run with four as a car). On November 5, 1997, with Jim Feuling at the controls, it set an official speed record of 332.103 mph. This was the fastest speed ever recorded for a “motorcycle” up to that time and earned two AMA and two Land Speed Authority world records. On a return run he hit an unofficial 370 mph.
     Feuling redesigned and built a highly modified Oldsmobile Quad-Four which produced 1,271 horsepower from 121 cubic inches, or 10.5-hp per cubic inch. This was the highest specific output (power divided by displacement) ever achieved by an automobile engine at that time.
     Fueling Engineering also built the Oldsmobile Quad-Four “BE” engine with twin turbos that powered four-time Indy 500 winner A.J. Foyt’s record-setting Aerotech to a world record of 267.339 mph at Ft. Stockton, TX. For his accomplishments with the Aerotech, Feuling received the “Outstanding Technical Achievement Award” from the National Engineering Societies in 1988.
     In 1993, Jim Feuling developed the Feuling SS helmet for Bell. It utilized his patented aerodynamic design employing a front lip and rear shape designed to reduce high-speed lift and buffeting found in other helmets used in GP/Indy Car racing.
     Jim Feuling had many other patents, including a dual-crankshaft engine, direct fuel injection, variable valve timing, a pulse cam and an anti-reversion exhaust that improved air flow through the engine. Among his automotive designs were aluminum three-valve Centerfire cylinder heads, which were available for Chevrolet 7.4-liter and Ford 7.5-liter V-8 engines. Additionally, Feuling developed an engine for the two-seat Q-2 airplane, which was rated to be the world’s most efficient. Feuling engines and high-performance parts have been used worldwide in every venue from off-road racing to Formula One and the Indy 500.
     Like many exceptionally bright inventors, Feuling was involved in a number of lawsuits related to his patents, filed both by and against him. Some of this litigation against large deep-pocket corporations also proved to be very expensive, particularly the three-valve head designs.
     James J. Feuling was born on March 11, 1945 and died December 4, 2002 at the age of 57. Based on what he managed to do with older technology, we can only imagine what Feuling might have accomplished if his life had not been cut short.
     The Feuling Bonneville streamliner was the most aerodynamic full size vehicle ever tested by the GM wind tunnel at the time, needing just 6 hp to go 100 mph. Feuling’s aircraft garnered numerous world records and he was the first to apply lean-burn technology to aviation. The Challenger above was an electric single-seater capable of 100+ mph for 200+ miles and 200 MPGe at 4000'. Fueling designed and licensed his patented “aero” helmet to Bell. First worn by Michael Schumacher, it reduced cockpit buffeting to improve vision and also added power by aiding air intake efficiency. Fueling designed and licensed his patented three-valve combustion chamber cylinder heads to Ford Motor Company.

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STAFF NOTES: In the last issue of the SLSRH there was a story about Ak Miller by LeRoi “Tex” Smith. Here are two stories about Ak that I wrote with the excellent photography of Roger Rohrdanz.
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Gone Racin’… Ak Miller. Story by Richard Parks, photographic consultant Roger Rohrdanz. Revised May 22, 2013. First written 2005.
   Ak Miller is a legend among racers. This means that he doesn’t need to embellish his exploits, for we do that for him. Ak’s done about everything a racer wants to do. He’s raced the dry lakes, Bonneville Salt Flats, Pike’s Peak Hill Climb and road races in Italy and Mexico. Elected President of the SCTA (Southern California Timing Association) and Vice President of the NHRA (National Hot Rod Association), and a member of the Dry Lakes Hall of Fame, Ak has his share and more of auto racing honors. Yet he is more than just an award winner, elected official or quick and speedy racer. It’s the twinkle in his eye, entrancing smile, ready wit and charisma that gets you off balance and makes you fair game for this lively and charming fellow. Stories and tales surround him, and grow larger and more complex with the years. This has given rise to a colloquial expression, “that’s Ak,” meaning a story bunyunesque or too farfetched to be true. But those who say this are mistaken for he has never had to create a tale; he has lived a life many of us only dream of.
   Born Akton Moeller, in Denmark, eighty-one years ago, his family immigrated to Southern California when he was just a small child. He worked in various garages as a youth and for Hannah Nixon, in their store in Whittier, back in the 1930’s. Ak remembers seeing Richard Nixon studying at the old secretary desk in the store, and asking Ak to bring him a candy bar and to “help yourself as well.” RMN was already a practiced politician! Years later, when visiting the White House as a member of a racing contingent, Ak found himself teased and everyone doubted that he had ever known the President. Nixon strode in and grasped the hand of his old friend and said, “Ak, did you bring me a candy bar?” Le Roi “Tex” Smith says that Ak harbored a real dislike of the President, but I think that came more from familiarity with him than hatred of the man. But it is true that all you had to do was mention Nixon’s name to get a rise out of Ak.
   He followed his brothers, Lawrence (Old Dad) and Zeke, to the dry lakes in the 1930’s, and began a love affair with racing that lasts to this day. He was “the Kid” surrounded by young men in their late teens and early twenties, but they couldn’t keep him out. He loved hot rodding with a white hot fire and zeal. He was a charter member of the Roadrunners, one of the original car clubs that absorbed the remnants of the Muroc Timing Association, and formed it into the storied SCTA, in December of 1937. Ak raced whatever was available, even an old derelict model T that was abandoned in the desert. He would remove the battery after racing the old heap, and was always surprised to find it still there when he returned for the next meet. It didn’t set any records, but it gave his car club valuable points toward the season’s championship trophy. Ak devoured the rule book. Many accused him of cheating, but he didn’t have to as he knew every rule and the fine points of the regulations. He built cars to set records and he teamed up with guys who knew how to race.
   Ak had wanted to join the Army Air Corp during WWII, but was transferred to the Army and sent to Europe to fight in the Battle of the Bulge. Surrounded, in freezing weather, with no support, he was forced to fight merely to stay alive. He came upon a German officer cooking a steak, cut from the flank of a dying cow, and so overcome by hunger, one having food and the other without, that they shot at each other for the food’s sake. Ak was quicker that day, winning the steak and a prisoner. He was less fortunate when frostbite ended his war and sent him back to England, unsure whether they would amputate his feet.
   Returning from the war, Ak rejoined the SCTA and served as its President, and with his close friend and fellow Roadrunner’s club member, Wally Parks, and later served as Vice President of the newly formed NHRA in the early 1950’s. Miller and Parks were not only close friends, but they were steadfast partners in the running of the SCTA in the late 1940’s, a time of unprecedented growth in all motorsports. Parks served one term as President of the SCTA in 1946 and then Miller served two terms. They led the effort to create a growing and vibrant timing association. Ak was also instrumental in forming the first Hot Rod Exposition in 1948, the first hot rod show that set the example for all the successful car shows that we see today. Ak was a great supporter of the effort to land a contract with the Salt Lake City Chamber of Commerce, which allowed Southern California hot rodders to use the salt flats for timing trials. 
   His leadership was extremely valuable during this period of post-war reconstruction of the racing association. His geniality, kindliness and name recognition was vital in the early growth of the NHRA as well. He could also be a bull of a man; stubborn and confrontational when his sport was attacked or betrayed. His friends felt the same way and he rarely tolerated those who put down hot rodding and land speed racing. His heart was in Land Speed Racing and he left the NHRA to return to land speed racing at Bonneville and El Mirage, where over the years, the Miller/Lufkin/Carr team set and reset hundreds of records. In 1953-54, Miller raced a modified T-roadster in the Mexican Road Race. Quick on the turns and curves in the mountains, the little roadster would give up its lead in the straight-aways to the more powerful European cars, but he still placed 8th in 1953 and 5th in 1954.
   The Miller Brothers garage was originally located in Whittier where he and his brothers, Zeke and Lawrence (Old Dad) worked. Zeke’s wife, Dorothy Miller, ran the office in a no-nonsense manner. “I had to,” she said, “or we would never get any work done.” It didn’t take much to get things out of hand and before long Dorothy’s booming voice would chastise the brothers as they ran around the shop squirting oil from oil cans at each other. When the mood struck or there was a race, Ak would just take off, much to the chagrin of Dorothy. Zeke would never put on a seat belt. “I saw a man crash at El Mirage and the homemade seat belt wouldn’t open. He burned to death screaming for help,” Zeke said. A lot of old racers hated seat belts and safety innovations that they thought were silly. But not Ak, who was an inspector and who also supported all the new safety rules being implemented after WWII. Another story that Ak loved to tell was about his job as a safety inspector at the dry lakes and Bonneville. “I would tell this guy that he couldn’t run, that his car wasn’t safe and then he went over to Wally and complained about me. Your dad had quite a sense of humor, so he comes over to me with his shoulders hunched and he says, ‘Ak, did you fail this guy’s car?’ I told Wally, ‘Yes, it’s unsafe.’ Wally turns to the guy and says, ‘Ak says your car is unsafe,’ and just turns and walks away, leaving the guy speechless.” 
   Miller left his garage in the 1960’s to work for Ford, and run in the Mobil Economy Runs. He was a terror at the Pike’s Peak Hill Climbs, winning nine times in his class, with Ray Brock as his crew. He and Brock also competed in and won their class in the 1963 Baja 1000 Road Race. Ak always reduced a man’s given name to a nickname and he could size up a person in an instant. Once you were stuck with one of Ak’s creations that is how everyone knew you in the hot rodding community. 
   Another story always made him laugh. Wally Parks and Ak were making a small fire on the Bonneville Salt Flats to cook some frankfurters when this Texan drove up in a brand new Cadillac and a ten gallon Stetson on his head. The man asked a question about the time trials going on, but before Ak could answer there was an explosion that sent bits of charcoal and wood flying into the air and down on the man’s car, leaving scorch marks. The more Ak told that story the more people said he made it up. One day I asked my father about that story and dad broke up in laughter and said, “Boy was that guy mad,” which confirmed the story. Ak told another story about how an airline pilot wanted to drive his car and set a record. The pilot crashed in the car before there was arm net restraints and as the car tipped over the man’s hand flipped out and his hand was severed. That accident caused the SCTA to institute new safety guidelines.
   I remember the old garage in Whittier and how the ramp went down into the building. Nearby was the Taylor and Ryan Engine shop and the guys would all gather every time my father would show up to conduct SCTA business or just to benchrace. I got to sit on Ak’s lap and he would tell me stories that I was way too young to remember. But later in life I visited Ak wherever I could. He was like an Uncle or Godfather towards me. He liked kids if they behaved, but he never had any children of his own. He was married four times, twice to Marilyn Miller and he was brutally honest about his marriages. “All four women left me poorer each time, but they deserved every dime they got from the settlements; I was a lousy husband.” Maybe that might be true, but I sort of doubt that; Ak was a loveable guy, he was just absent a lot.
   It was those absences that led to his legend. He raced in Mexico and Baja and Italy and Pike’s Peak and Bonneville and the dry lakes and the list goes on and on. Ak tells the story about a motorcycle race in Baja California, or it could have just been an outing. He was woefully unprepared and somewhere in the trackless desert he literally falls off his bike so dehydrated that he can no longer sit upright. “My arms are spread-eagled out and I’m looking up at these buzzards flying overhead and I know that soon I’ll just be a meal for them. Along comes another racer and he stops and says, ‘Ak, how’re you doing.’ ‘I’m just takin’ a short rest,’ I tell him and he says, ‘Good, I’ll tell ‘em up ahead to set a place for you at the cantina,’ and off he goes. Well, I can’t let the guys down so I dragged my half-dead body back up on that motorcycle and left the buzzards hungry.” It’s true that Ak reworked his stories to improve on them. But we all do that. I try and remember children’s fairy tales when the grandkids want to hear them. They always come out different. It’s like the Grimm Brothers and Aesop got the story a bit off and I’ve got to correct the tale. The same was true of Ak, he didn’t so much change the story as improve upon it.
   Ak worked at his garage until age and infirmity made him stop. Then he moved a trailer inside a workshop owned by his ex-wife Marilyn Miller, so that he was never far from his good friend and partner, Jack Lufkin, who kept Miller’s Garage humming and successful. I remember going over to Marilyn’s shop and talking to Ak. I taped a lot of what he said, but years later I could never find those tapes. But they aren’t necessary because I got the drift of what he was saying over time and when I write down his stories I tell them the way that he wanted them to be told, only better. You see, there are historical facts and those we get right and then there are stories that tell a moral that we want the next generation to learn. That’s what Ak did; he told stories that left us with a core of truth that made us all better people if we would only listen. There are a lot of people who collect Millerisms, or stories told by Ak Miller. They have a life of their own; a special kind of world inhabited by hot rodders. Ak always stopped what he was doing, sat you down, and regaled you with another of his amazing stories, and as I’ve said before, they are all remarkably true. 
Gone Racin’ is at RNPARKS1@JUNO.COM.

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Gone Racin’ to…Ak Miller’s Tribute. Story by Richard Parks, photographs by Roger Rohrdanz. June 28, 2005

  Ak Miller was honored on June 28, 2005, at the Wally Parks NHRA Motorsports Museum in Pomona, California. The event was organized by Dick and Beverley Martin and was attended by nearly 100 of Ak’s friends. Ak Miller is a legend among hot rodders and racers. He followed his brothers, Lawrence and Zeke, into dry lakes racing in the 1930’s, and has participated in all forms of motor racing, including road racing, Pike’s Peak Challenges, land speed and off-road racing. Ak returned from fighting in the Battle of the Bulge in WWII to continue with his racing career and opened a garage with his brother Zeke. He followed his good friend, Wally Parks, as the President of the SCTA (Southern California Timing Association) and was an avid land speeder. Parks also asked Ak to serve on the Board of Directors for the new NHRA. Miller left the Miller Brothers Garage to open up his own auto repair and speed shop garage. Then came a stint with the Ford Motor Company as the racing program consultant. But whenever Ak heard of a race, he closed the shop and went racing. He built the famed El Caballo de Hierro, or Horse of Iron, and took it down to Mexico to race in the Pan-Americana Road Race in the 1950’s. Ray Brock and Doug Harrison were among those on his team, and they raced and partied their way from Southern Mexico all the way to the American border. Ak also raced at Pike’s Peak and in the Miglia Italia road race in Italy, where he is remembered to this day. At the age of 72, Ak was offered a ride in the Earl Wooden Crossley Coupe and set a record at Bonneville over 200 miles an hour to join the prestigious 200 MPH Club and earn the privilege to wear the Red Cap. 
  Ak met Jack Lufkin in the early 1950’s, just after Lufkin got out of the Air Force, and these two became a potent racing team, with Miller tuning the engines and Lufkin setting hundreds of land speed records. They later teamed up with Leonard Carr to form the Miller/Lufkin/Carr land speed racing team that put many people into the 200 MPH Club. Ak was instrumental in helping many young racers, including my brother David, with advice, parts and engines, which assisted them in their racing careers. Miller turned to turbocharging and began another successful career. He made a lot of friends in this new business, including Dick Martin, known as Turboguy. Ak made it a lifetime goal to help others. Many people at the Tribute came to pay their respects and to tell Ak how much he has meant to them. Jim and Steve Shaw edited film of Ak’s career and made a video that was riveting to watch. Marilyn Miller donated the food and beverages for the guests. Robert “Pete” Petersen, Mr. Hot Rod Magazine, Jerry Kugel and others donated funds to help put on the tribute. Boyd Harnell developed his photographs from the Pan-Americana Road Race and enlarged them to give to his old friend. Ed Justice Jr, president of Justice Brothers Car Care Products, put on a magic show that kept the audience enthralled, except for his dad, Ed Sr, who knew all the tricks. George Barris came to pay his respects and to note that “the car culture has really come along.” George had just finished his own car show and auction in Hollywood in conjunction with Debbie Baker to raise funds for cancer research.
  Wally Parks praised Ak for all that he did in SCTA and for their club, the Road Runners. Parks told the audience how Ak inspired people to do things. He related how they all worked together to help Doc Ostich build and race the
Flying Caduceus, an early jet car that helped to set the stage for the successful advent of the Breedlove/Arfons/Noble jet cars of the 1960’s. He said that Ak and Ray would tease each other unmercifully and get a rhyming patter going about how awful the other one was. They both had a comedic talent that kept everyone in stitches. Ak was a clever punster and could change anyone’s name or personality into a catchy nickname, which would become permanent as soon as he uttered it. Joann Brock spoke of the old times together. He had that twinkle in his eye and a kind word for everyone, and a boyish charm that never went stale. Joann and Ray went with Ak to Pike’s Peak, Baja California, Bonneville, Mexico and many other exotic racing locales and never tired of their trips together. She spoke of the one-liners that Ray and Ak pestered each other with and told the audience of some of the nicknames Miller came up with.
  Charles Rollins, Joann Brock’s son-in-law, also mentioned how Ray and Ak would torment each other in a kidding way. He talked about the rich stories Ak would tell them, and referred to it as Miller’s Syndrome; “for making a good story better.” Rollins said that Miller is still collecting a small pension from the Army for his WWII war injuries. Ak interjected and said he was fortunate to have kept his toes after suffering frostbite in the Battle of the Bulge. Rollins thanked Bruce Glasscock for restoring the
El Caballo de Hierro racecar. He then said that Ak’s cars had unusual names, like The Misconception, and The Blob, because the cars were nothing to look at. Miller brought the house down in a surge of laughter and applause when he retorted, “I came to race, not work on my car.” Bob Corn of Roush Racing, traveled to the event from Michigan along with his wife Nancy. He spoke to the crowd about his days with Ak at Ford Motor Company when he was a young engineer and Miller was Ford’s Racing Consultant. Ak traveled all over the country setting up the Ford Racing Team displays, and recalled how that had been some of the best times of his life. “I’ll always be a Ford man,” said Ak. Dick Martin recalled the time a man came to him and tried to sell him a truckful of turbochargers. It seemed fishy and he called Ak. “Don’t buy them from that guy, he stole them from me.” Earl Wooden honored Ak for all that he has done for the land speed racing community over the years and spoke with pride about having Ak attain the Red cap of the 200 MPH Club in his Crossley Coupe in 1991. He talked about the days at Bonneville and on the dry lakes of Southern California.
  Fred Carrillo told the throng that he was Miller’s best man at his first marriage. They were both Road Runners and raced against each other at the SCTA dry lakes meets. George Barris returned to the podium to talk about the days when he and Ak traveled the country on behalf of the Ford Custom Car Caravan. It was a time when the greatest car engineers and designers met with the best of the hot rodders and racers like Ak. Ed Iskenderian raised his hand and asked to speak. “Set the stopwatch,” someone yelled from the audience, but the ever good-natured Isky was not deterred and took over the microphone. He said that Ak brought color and excitement to the Mexican road races that he entered. He added his comments about the stolen shipment of superchargers. “They were sold to Chuck Potvin, who lost a good deal of money when he found out they were stolen.” Then he left the podium and announced, “If I think of something else I might come up later,” which brought out groans and comments of “bring a stopwatch,” from the audience. The hot rodders tease Isky, but there is no one that they would rather hear from, unless it is the irrepressible Miller himself.
  Ron Benham spoke about Ak’s record run in the Earl Wooden Crossley Coupe. Benham had built the car and sold it to Wooden. That car qualified many a land speed racer for a record, and Benham has built cars that put a lot of people into the record books, including Ak. Jim Travis spoke of the time Miller took him out in his roadster and went over 120mph down the city roads. “That was the last time I let him do that to me.” Jim spoke fondly of the Miller/Lufkin/Carr team at Bonneville. They would have 4 cars at the Salt Flats and they were always breaking records and later the parties would be notorious. Lufkin was known as quite the gambler and had a mathematical method for winning. Sam Jackson, director of the
Wally Parks NHRA Motorsports Museum, thanked the crowd for coming to the tribute for Miller and said, “This is the first time that I have met Ak, but I have heard about his exploits, the trips to Goodwood and Miller’s other deeds.” Jackson went on to add, “The museum is a living place, a place of history,” and to come back often and hold events such as the one today. Boyd Harnell presented enlargements of Ak racing in the Pan-Americana Road Race and how fascinating that time was. Ron Cummings told the audience many of his Ak stories. Cummings said that Ak raced in SCCA Road races, and had 5 cars. He raced against Stirling Moss, Richie Gunther, Phil Hill and Dan Gurney in the L.A. Times Road Race. He was very good and if he had better equipment would have been a household name. But at this race he was getting black flagged off the track by a referee for dropping oil on the track. Each time Ak would make up ground on the leaders, this referee would black flag him off the track. After the race Ak found out that the man who had black-flagged him was the husband of a lady Ak knew.
  Leslie Long said that Joe Reath had challenged Ak to a race and lost, whereupon Jack Lufkin piped up, “Ak’s never been beaten in a fair race.” Dick Martin said, “Ak’s gotten a lot of speeding tickets in his lifetime. He’s an unregimented racer just like Max Balchowsky was.” Ak made such an impression on Martin with his vast racing experience and folklore that Ak became the first hot rod legend that Martin wrote about for Rod & Custom Magazine. Ed Iskenderian, as he promised grabbed the mike. “I’d be willing to pay for Ak’s stories.” Ron Hope, driver of Don Green’s fuel altered drag car,
The Rat Trap, told about hanging around Miller’s shop. He learned a great deal and said that “Ak and Jack Lufkin were a great influence and launched many a career and helped the kids along in their racing ventures.” Frank Morimoto spoke about the dry lakes days and Kam and Harry Oka and the Miller brothers. 
   Finally, the great man himself took the microphone and though he was in a wheelchair, his voice was still strong and full of life and he regaled the audience with his wit and charm. “It’s been a lot of fun listening to all you racers,” he said. The audience was quiet as Miller continued, “all these guys were always trying to beat me, with my reputation and all, and getting me into trouble,” he said with a twinkle in his eye. “The police gave his mother a ticket for me, and she boxed my ears. It was 3 dollars or 3 days in the pokey in those days, and we always opted for the pokey. Money was really worth something in those days.” Miller spoke about the good old days of hot rodding, and teased all those that had teased him at his tribute. Then he became serious and said, “If you want to know about the early days in hot rodding, go talk to my good friend Wally Parks,” and with that he handed the microphone back to Dick Martin and received a standing ovation. 
  Others who came to show their respects included: Stormin’ Norman Benham, Richard Miazga, Don Kanotick, Phil Hara, Johnny Ryan, Bob Keller, Mark Saxlond, Bruce Eikenberger, Jim Moran, Rory Rinebold, Eric “Rick” Rickman, Michael Rickman, Don Blair, John McDowell, Dennis Jones, James and Earlene Smith, Mike Jones, Nancy Corn, Pete and Doris Pierce, Barbara Parks, Roger Rohrdanz, Jack Gingrich, John Watt, Dan and Doris Eames, Chuck Nippress, Vic Cunningham, Wayne Phillips, Jim “Jake” Jacobs, Tim Timmerman, Mike Cincola, Bill “Whizzer Bike” and Joey Graham, Bruce Glasscock, Jim Miller, Louis Senter, Ross Haas, Rick Burley, Bob Millner, Nick Arias Jr, Randy Schmitt, John Della Porta, Sherry Watkins, Lee Wasden, Bob Wildoner, Ernie and Dion Chapman, Don Zabel, George Callaway, Jon Meyer, Duane McKinney and many others. 
Gone Racin’ is at RNPARKS2@JUNO.COM

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STAFF NOTES: The following comes from the Jessica Clark Racing Newsletter. 
Hi Everyone:
   During the month of May I had the chance to put my car on display at the YMCA Indian Guides Soap Box Derby and race at my all time favorite track, the Las Vegas Bullring. I made an appearance at the Soap Box Derby on May 5th and had a blast. I loved seeing all of the creative soap box cars the kids made with their dads. I was also able to lend support to Family Rescue Center, a charity serving the hungry, low-income families, and the homeless. I ended up racing the yellow Ferrari soap box car against the coordinator for the event, Neil Ticktin, and I won. It was great to see the kids having so much fun, and I loved being able to put smiles on their faces.
   May 11th was a big race day for the Lucas Oil Modified Series. 44 cars showed up to race on Saturday and only 24 of us would be allowed into the A Main event. As usual the top 16 qualifiers advanced directly into the A Main, while the rest had to race for a transfer spot in the B Main event. Needless to say, qualifying is one of the most important aspects of race day. Seeing 44 competitive drivers show up at my favorite track was exciting, but I must admit that I was a little worried about qualifying.
   Fortunately, I qualified 15th and transferred directly into the A Main event. It’s a good thing too, because we didn’t have enough fuel left for a 30 lap B main event and a 75 lap A main. Since I qualified 15th I started the race in that position and prepared myself for the wild race to begin - yes, it was wild. By lap 25 three wrecks had already occurred… directly in front of me. I missed them all. However, I had to spin the car to avoid these crashes and this was terrible for my tires. Spinning causes flat spots and heat spikes the tires, which then causes them to lose grip. By lap 55 an oil spill gave us a chance to shut down our motors for a red flag.
   Once we began racing again I started to notice how badly damaged my tires were, and I was losing a lot of grip exiting the corners. I had been running in 9th place for about 20 laps, and with five laps to go I got on the throttle too hard and spun myself out. This was embarrassing because I RARELY spin out all by myself during races; however, my tires had had enough. I was sent to the back with only a few laps left. The best part of the race came when I dove underneath a guy at the finish line to claim 13th place. I was happy that we were able to roll the car back in the trailer without any damage considering all of the incidents that occurred. Thanks Dad, Mom, Uncle Rick, Steve Teets, and Jimmy Dickerson for your help in Vegas.
   At the end of May I completed my first full year as a college student at Santa Barbara City College. I will be tutoring students in American Sign Language during the summer. I’m excited to continue learning about the deaf community and deaf culture.  What’s next for Jessica Clark Racing? In June we will be at Rocky Mountain Raceway in Utah - it’s going to be a long drive. I raced my Midget at this track a couple years ago, and I look forward to seeing how my Lucas Oil Modified handles there. On June 9th I’ve been invited to put my car on display at a charity car show at Johnny Carson Park in Burbank. This car show will be hosted by the Road Kings of Burbank so please be sure to stop by if you're in town. Jessica Clark, info@jessicaclarkracing.com

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DOANE. By Le Roi Tex Smith 
   Doane lived on the hill, over across Tujunga Wash from me, and just a stone’s throw from Norm Grabowski. Doane Spencer was a doer, somewhat reserved, and willing to let the big mouths ramble on while he steadily got the job done. He was a great mechanic, an excellent fabricator, and pleasant to be around. He was a perfect example of a Real Hot Rodder. Well, except for the fact he let one of his daughters talk him into fixing her a car. A Morris Minor. One of those typical English POS thingies. It was just an ordinary little sewing machine, the more so in the care of a beautiful young girl. However, I must admit that it looked pretty good, because it was a woody wagon. And it would have been a real POS had it belonged to me or similar contemporary rod builders. As with everything Spencer, this little English timber pile was good looking, and it usually ran great. Exactly what daughter Wendy needed. 
   Saving grace to this off-side of import catastrophes was that in the home garage was always some kind of exotic Italian POS that Doane was saving for some bucks-up Hollywood type. And saving grace for that FU was Doane’s personal ‘Bird that was in perennial semi storage, awaiting the time when he could get around to doing something with it. By now, you should be getting the drift. With his living so close, I could keep up with most of Spencer’s exotic side. Not so easy to keep track of an endless procession of ‘’Just helping out” projects in the hot rod world. Thankfully, I never had to press our friendship for any of my hot rod projects, since the area was choc-a-block with similar craftsmen. Our part of San Fernando Valley was, and remains, a gold mine of automotive talent. 
   Late of a night, I would hear the throaty bellow of some unmuffled highway terror coming down the hill from his house. At the bottom was a two-lane that bordered Tujunga Wash, and on which Doane had marked off a measured distanced over which he could time his latest engine tune masterpieces. There would be a slight pause, so I knew he was turning onto the street (there were only a couple of houses on a full mile stretch of smooth macadam) followed by the staccato blast as Spencer would wind through the gears. A return blast, and back up the hill he would go. It was nice to have such a road test course handy, and I took advantage of his measurement on numerous occasions. 
   Our part of San Fernando Valley was a gold mine of automotive talent. One such a business was Valley Custom, which was a five minute ride, and it is where Doane had some of his metal shaping done, and where neighbor Norm Grabowski went for much of his body and paint work. But in the cloistered world of street rodding, Doane Spencer is better remembered for a certain l932 Ford roadster. Black. Interesting kick-up’s on the frame to get it down. Steering pitman arm out the cowl panel. Maybe the most famous DuVal windshield ever. And it set over in a garage corner, neglected. I kept at him to let me buy the car. The fact that I never had any money certainly didn’t deter me pestering him about the car. The fact the car had no engine didn’t bother me, either.  
   So it was with considerable consternation that I greeted the news from Lynn Wineland (he of Rod & Custom magazine lineage) that he, and not me, was the new owner of Doane’s famed deuce. Of course, back then the car was famed to a precious few. Me, Lynn, and Neal East come to mind. Two of us ended up as eventual owners. I was not one of them. When I mentioned the error of his ways in selling MY car to Lynn, Doane replied that MY car had gone to Lynn because Lynn had expressed an interest earlier. Another one to the Sooners, by damn. Anyway, Doane had built his Deuce before War Two, then when the Mexican Road Race came along after the war, he had torn it apart and started a rebuild with running the race in mind. He knew Ak Miller, who eventually did run a hot rod down there, so maybe AK was the germ for the idea. Or ‘tother way around maybe. 
   So, Doane ended up stripping the side rails from another ’32 frame, with which he boxed his rod chassis. Made it super stiff, then he went to work on tuning the Old Ford design and the result was a great handling car. Early on Spencer ran a flatmotor, but he was convinced he would need something much stouter and stronger for Mexico. He had several engines around his shop during the early Fifties, I don’t know if one of those was intended for his race foray. By the time the roadster was in Lynn’s hands, the decision had been made to put in a Ford OHV. 
   Then, Lynn decided to move on to other things (Lynn penned the name ‘Go Kart’ by the way), and the car moved over to Neal. Still without my permission. So Neal started piddling away on the project, in amongst several other interests, and the roadster never did get to a road race. Where it is now I have no idea, but whoever has it just understand that it is really MY car, so treat it with respect. I’ll take up all this tomfoolery with Spencer if we get together again in the great by and by. I don’t know if Wendy still has that English POS, either.

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Aussie Invader 3 June 2013 - Newsletter 
   Howdy to all the dedicated folks who are following, sponsoring, supporting or just interested in our history making venture to be the first team on earth to reach the holy grail of motor racing… 1000 mph or 1600 + km/h in our rocket powered car.
   We kicked off our month with a special appearance at the V8 Supercars at Barbagallo Raceway here in Perth with Aussie Invader 3 (Australia’s Fastest Car) which is powered by an Aussie built ATAR engine as fitted to a Mirage Fighter jet. Our long time team member and race car driver John Clark was recently appointed as MD of Barbagallo Raceway. We were invited to put our beautiful and fast (1,026 km/h) car on show for this exciting 3 day event which featured the cream of Australia’s talented V8 Supercar drivers. What a huge 3 days it was with people flocking to take a look at our baby, marveling at the awesome bodywork which was painted by Parins here in Perth and Compac Marketing all those years ago and still looking like it was done yesterday.
   The amazing thing is that bright paintwork and car sign writing for the record attempt in 1996 is still promoting the great sponsors of that time who helped make the Aussie Invader 3 part of Australian and World LSR sporting history. Aussie Invader 5R will be the same, with sponsors being promoted for many years into the future, not just during the lead up to and during record attempts. The Budweiser rocket car is still promoting its sponsor 30+ years after it retired. Please contact us if you would like to learn more about becoming a sponsor.  At Barbagallo Raceway my team and I spoke with hundreds of patrons at the V8 Supercars with thousands of photos being taken and some really genuine and positive compliments from everyone for our latest venture, Aussie Invader 5R and our epic mission to achieve a speed in a car faster than a bullet.
   We are really excited as Kentin Engineering have completed the machining of our front axle, and Veem Engineering have completed the balancing on our Calm Aluminium, John Ackroyd designed solid 7050 T6 tireless wheels. We are busy this week assembling our SKF quad angular contact bearings into our wheels and marrying up our front axle to the wheels. We are hoping to have our car rolling within the next few weeks. We have just finished the final work on our engine rollout stand. This stand allows us to remove/replace our engine with ease, should we need to make any adjustments to our actuators or regulators which are located forward of our rocket motor. This rollout stand makes life a lot easier, so thanks to all that helped, Chris, Ivan, Pete and Ruben for your great work.  
   Our hydraulic systems are nearly completed thanks to Glenn Woodward from Mining and Hydraulics Supplies. We are now awaiting the completion of our wiring harness before we can test all of our hydraulic systems. The Aussie Invader team is getting the word out there to young and old and long-time team member Pete Taylor has just returned home from a model display he kindly does on our behalf every year. The response he receives at these model shows is fantastic and this year we had the brand new 2.5 metre model to display that Chris Demunck built, along with Pete’s slightly smaller version. We also had one of our earlier designs on display, a twin hybrid rocket powered car we were trying to build with our great mates at SpaceDev in San Diego a few years past. Thanks Pete for your effort and dedication.  
   We are always inspired and amazed at the response from some of the great people who join our 1000 MPH Club. This past week we have received some terrific support from three different companies not at all associated with racecars but just excited to be a part of our adventure. Thank must go to Tim, Dougie and Phillip our newest members and all of our other 1000 MPH Club Members.  We have some exciting events coming very soon that all our 1000 MPH Club members will be invited to, once our car is rolling. Sorry to all of you living interstate or overseas. We had a small feature in a video that promotes Australia, its people and innovation. It is used Internationally to showcase Australia and we are proud to have been featured. Please click here to view the video on YouTube. Boy it’s all happening and more great things are just around the corner. Until the next time, take care and be your very best. Rosco McGlashan OAM; Fastest Aussie on Earth.

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John Hutchinson, from Great Britain, shared this link and article with us from http://www.myrideisme.com/Blog/bloodhound-ssc-update-rolls-royce/
   Bloodhound SSC has support from Rolls Royce. Posted by pikesan on May 14, 2013 in Press Release. Land Speed Racing: Quest for 1000 mph #2  
   The world land speed record of 763 mph is held by Thrust SSC, a UK team lead by BLOODHOUND’s Project Director Richard Noble and driven by Andy Green. Components for BLOODHOUND SSC are being manufactured by specialists across the UK and delivered to the BLOODHOUND Technical Centre in Bristol for assembly throughout 2013. UK runway testing (up to 200 mph) will get underway early 2014 before the team decamps to the Hakskeen Pan, South Africa to begin high speed testing. The BLOODHOUND team scoured the globe to find the perfect desert to run the car on, it needed to be at least 12 miles long, two miles wide and perfectly flat. The Hakskeen Pan, Northern Cape, South Africa was selected. 
   At full speed BLOODHOUND SSC will cover a mile in 3.6 seconds, that’s 4.5 football pitches laid end to end per second. BLOODHOUND has three power plants, a Rolls-Royce EJ200 jet from a Eurofighter Typhoon, a custom designed hybrid rocket and a 750 bhp Cosworth F1 engine that drives the rocket oxidiser pump. Between them they generate 135,000 equivalent hp, equal to 180 F1 cars.    
   Rolls-Royce PLC today announced support for The BLOODHOUND Project, an international education initiative focused on a 1,000 mph World Land Speed Record attempt. A Rolls-Royce EJ200 jet engine will be used in conjunction with a custom designed hybrid rocket to propel the car to over 1,000 mph (1,600 kmh or Mach 1.4). Rolls-Royce will also provide financial and technical support for the project. Announcing the partnership at an event for staff and BLOODHOUND team members at their Filton site, Bristol, Rolls-Royce Director of Engineering and Technology, Colin Smith, called for the UK to do more to inspire young people about science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Colin Smith CBE, Director of Engineering and Technology at Rolls-Royce, said: “Cutting edge engineering keeps Rolls-Royce, and the UK, at the forefront of global business. We understand the fundamental importance of inspiring young people about STEM and know that more needs to be done. Sponsoring BLOODHOUND gives us an opportunity to showcase world-class British engineering and invest in our future.”  
   Richard Noble OBE, BLOODHOUND Project Director said: “Rolls-Royce’s support of the Programme is invaluable, their highly motivated ambassadors will help us reach many more schools and youth groups across the country. Their experience of working within a first class aerospace company makes them perfect role models for aspiring engineers”. The Group’s iconic logo will now be displayed on the engine cowlings of BLOODHOUND’s Rolls-Royce built EJ200 jet engine; which, in its normal role, generates 20,000lb 90 kN thrust to power the twin-engined Eurofighter Typhoon combat aircraft. Rolls-Royce has a long and distinguished association with speed record breaking on land, sea and in the air. In the 1930’s its ‘Type R’ engine powered Sir Malcolm Campbell’s Bluebird cars and boats, Capt. George Eyston’s Thunderbolt car, Sir Henry Segrave’s Miss England II boat and the Supermarine S6B sea plane of Flt Lt John Boothman, outright winner of the Schnieder Trophy in 1931. Experience gained on the ‘R’ in the use of improved materials, supercharger technology and enhanced fuels was later used to great effect in the Merlin which saw action in the Spitfire, Hurricane, Lancaster and Mustang aircraft of World War Two. 
   More recently, in 1983, Richard Noble, now BLOODHOUND’s Project Director, used a Rolls-Royce Avon 302 1983 in Thrust 2 to set a record of 633.047 mph (1,019.47 km h) while two Spey 202 turbofan engines, as used in a McDonald Douglas F4 Phantom, enabled Wing Commander Andy Green to become the first, and so far only, person to break the sound barrier on land in Thrust SSC, which set the current record of 763.035 mph (1,227.986 km h) in 1997. The company did not officially sanction or endorse any of these activities, however. In 2008 Rolls-Royce became an early adopter of the project, formally deciding to provide the programme with essential engine support which in turn enabled the Ministry of Defense to loan three redundant early development EJ200 jet engines once the Eurofighter Typhoon flight development programme had been completed. The power systems company leant its expertise to the complex aerodynamics programme, the installation of the EJ200 and the optimisation of its air intake; a major challenge in its own right given the cars unique performance and its vast speed range.  
   Just as significant is the company’s support for BLOODHOUND’s global education programme, which aims to inspire the next generation of scientists, engineers and mathematicians in the 219 countries and territories where the Project is followed. 56 trained Rolls-Royce BLOODHOUND ambassadors will assist school teachers all over the country deliver exciting BLOODHOUND themed lessons. The ambassadors will play a key role in helping young people to make positive career choices by giving real life context to their science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects. Currently 5,442 UK primary and secondary schools have signed up to join the BLOODHOUND Education Programme, equating to roughly 2.5 million pupils.
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STAFF NOTES; More from John Hutchinson in England.

   l've been on vacation 12 times to America. l met your Mom and Dad in the Pomona Top Eliminator Club marquee at the 2001 NHRA Finals. l took a photo of your Dad & l got your Mom and Dad to sign my 2002 NHRA Calendar, see attachments. l've been to Youngstown, Ohio nine times, the first time was in 1978. My pen friend Buddy Fares Jr and his family live there. Our club the North East Hot Rod Association held monthly drag race meetings at Felton Dragstrip, near Felton, Northumberland from '72 till '74. l designed the club logo which we had printed onto t-shirts and jackets. Cheers John
   JOHN: Thank you for the photos. Tell me more about Felton and the North East Hot Rod Association. We don't hear much about activities in straight line racing outside of the United States. 
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John Hutchinson, from Great Britain sent in this video on Santa Pod Raceway, a drag strip in use today that had a storied past as an Air Base for the American Army Air Corp in England during World War II. See http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oR_L4nlGVGg.
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   RICHARD: l phoned and spoke with Colin Stevens today and he would like to be the European reporter for The Society of Land Speed Racing Historians. His email address is, colinhotrodts@btinternet.com. I've known Colin for approximately 5 years as he used to sell t-shirts, etc at Santa Pod Raceway. Best Regards, John.
   JOHN AND COLIN: Our group, the Society of Land Speed Racing Historians, was founded about five years ago on the steps of the Wally Parks NHRA Motorsports Museum, in Pomona, California. Jim Miller, Roger Rohrdanz and I felt that we needed to do something to save the history and heritage of straight-line racing (land speed time trials and drag racing). Biographies, memorabilia and knowledge of the past was being lost and we couldn't think of very many museums that could take any more items. Our goals then were to find places to take and do research on collectibles, including photographs and stories. I created a newsletter, Roger processed the photographs and Jim became our chief researcher, historian and president. 
   Our group has grown since then, but we have no idea how many there are since there are no applications to fill out, dues to pay or responsibilities. We are simply a group of individuals with a common purpose and that is to find, research, write and photograph all the history on LSR, drag racing and hot rodding. These are the main topics, but if we come across racing history outside of these themes we still investigate them. Mary Ann and Jack Lawford from Boise, Idaho lent us two of their websites to use; www.landspeedracing.com and www.hotrodhotline.com. We publish there. None of us are paid; we are all volunteers. We don't take paid advertisements, but we do encourage people to send us unpaid "news items" about their products, car shows and racing events. 
   We cover all land speed events, drag racing up through 1959 and hot rodding in general. We waive the rule on post-1960 drag racing when we run across an interesting historical episode in that sport. We also waive the rule against other motorsports when we learn something new and racers often crossed over from one sport to another. Any letter that comes to the SOCIETY OF LAND SPEED RACING HISTORIANS NEWSLETTER is published if there is historical content in it, but I don't allow blogging. I edit out superfluous language and adjectives. 
   A person is considered a member if they simply say they are. A member and a reader of the newsletter are basically the same. A reader/member can submit questions, stories, biographies or photographs. A correspondent is generally the same submitter of information, except that their name and email address goes on the masthead so that people can contact them if they need to. Some people submit a lot of information, but choose not to be correspondents or field reporters. We take current news and event dates, but generally we can't guarantee that we can publish quickly enough to be of much use to racing groups. We are a historical society, but we try to publish some current events too. 

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STAFF NOTES: Gil Coraine sent in the following information for events sponsored by the Wally Parks NHRA Motorsports Museum.
   SUMMER KICKS OFF WITH LADIES NIGHT JUNE 5th TWILIGHT CRUISE This month's Cruise theme is “Ladies Night” and woodies cars and trucks. Join us for some fun under the summer sun with hundreds of beautiful show cars, free Twilight Tech Talks seminars with Banks Engineering, prizes, music and lots of family fun from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. As always, admission is free.
   Museum Announces New Sponsors for the 11th annual Holley National Hot Rod Reunion in Bowling Green, Ky. NHRA Motorsports Museum is pleased to announce Crower Cams and Axalta Coating Systems as new sponsors for the 11th annual Holley National Hot Rod Reunion presented by AAA Insurance, June 13-15 at Beech Bend Raceway Park.
   Attached is a notice for the New England Hot Rod Reunion. Thanks again for your support of our event. Sincerely, Rose Dickinson Marketing & Advertising Manager, Wally Parks NHRA Motorsports Museum (909) 622-2575 FAX (909) 622-1206 http://www.nhramuseum.org/, Facebook Fan Page: http://www.facebook.com/NHRA.Museum. Twitter: http://twitter.com/NHRA_Museum. e-media Waves: http://nhra-museum.smbwaves.com/
September 12-14 New England Dragway Epping, NH Join Grand Marshal Jimmy King and celebrate the inaugural New England Hot Rod Reunion. September 12-14, 2013 (Thursday-Saturday) New England Dragway Epping, NH Get your tickets today for a history-making event! Unique among motorsports events, the HOT ROD REUNION’s honor some of the top names in hot rodding from the past and feature a fabulous array of nostalgic drag cars, street rods and customs of the historic and present-day hot rod eras. Hot Heads Eliminator Quarter-mile Nostalgia Drag Racing Show ‘N Shine with VIP picks! Vendor Midway and Vintage Swap Meet Jet Cars & Wheelstanding exhibition and the famed Cacklefest® lights the sky Saturday night. Honoring: Grand Marshal, Jimmy King, Darwin Doll, Tony Feil, Don Roberts, Pete Shadinger, A.B. & Bernie Shuman and the Orientals Car Club. For an event schedule and more information, log on to: NHRAMuseum.org ON SALE NOW! 800.884.NHRA NHRATIX.COM 

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Land Speed Racing Websites:
www.hotrodhotline.com, www.landspeedracing.com

 [Email Land Speed Racing]

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Members:

Jonathan Amo, Brett Arena, Henry Astor, Gale Banks, Glen Barrett, Mike Bastian, Lee Blaisdell, Jim Bremner, Warren Bullis, Burly Burlile, George Callaway, Gary Carmichael, John Backus, John Chambard, Jerry Cornelison, G. Thatcher Darwin, Jack Dolan, Ugo Fadini, Bob Falcon, Rich Fox, Glenn Freudenberger, Don Garlits, Bruce Geisler, Stan Goldstein, Andy Granatelli, Walt James, Wendy Jeffries, Ken Kelley, Mike Kelly, Bret Kepner, Kay Kimes, Jim Lattin, Mary Ann and Jack Lawford, Fred Lobello, Eric Loe, Dick Martin, Ron Martinez, Tom McIntyre, Don McMeekin, Bob McMillian, Tom Medley, Jim Miller, Don Montgomery, Bob Morton, Mark Morton, Paula Murphy, Landspeed Louise Ann Noeth, Frank Oddo, David Parks, Richard Parks, Wally Parks (in memoriam), Eric Rickman, Willard Ritchie, Roger Rohrdanz, Evelyn Roth, Ed Safarik, Frank Salzberg, Dave Seely, Charles Shaffer, Mike Stanton, David Steele, Doug Stokes, Bob Storck, Zach Suhr, Maggie Summers, Gary Svoboda, Pat Swanson, Al Teague, JD Tone, Jim Travis, Randy Travis, Jack Underwood and Tina Van Curen, Richard Venza.
 

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